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Socialist Handbook, Campaign 1916
Image 58
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Socialist Party (U.S.). Socialist Handbook, Campaign 1916 - Image 58. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/260/show/249.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Party (U.S.). (1916). Socialist Handbook, Campaign 1916 - Image 58. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/260/show/249

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Party (U.S.), Socialist Handbook, Campaign 1916 - Image 58, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/260/show/249.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Socialist Handbook, Campaign 1916
Alternative Title Socialist handbook, for president, Allen L. Benson; for vice-president, George R. Kirkpatrick; the workers' candidates, not backed by Wall street or the war trust
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Party (U.S.)
Publisher Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Campaign literature
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Party (U.S.)
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 17 cm.
Original Item Location HX89.S62
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304531~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 58
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11666601_057.jpg
Transcript 10—Nevada, 1914. 11—Montana, 1914. 12—Illinois, 1913. Nearly complete. The twenty-one states allowing partial suffrage to women are: Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan (defeated full suffrage in 1912), Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri (defeated full suffrage in 1914), Nebraska (defeated full suffrage in 1914), New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota (defeated full suffrage in 1914), Oklahoma, Ohio (defeated full suffrage in 1912 and in 1914), South Dakota (defeated full suffrage in 1914), Vermont and Wisconsin. WHY WE MUST HAVE AN AMENDMENT TO THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION By MARY BEARD and FLORENCE KELLEY A Study of State Constitutions Which Lack Suffrage Amendments Issued by the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. Reprinted by the National Office of the Socialist Party. In view of the fact that both of the old parties have offered to give women the right of franchise by way of state enactments, it is interesting to read the following catalog of difficulties in the way along that line—difficulties that make the task almost hopeless. The notion is current that the extension of the suffrage to women is essentially a state matter, capable of simple, democratic treatment, which ought to be entirely satisfactory to the women who are still without votes. Instead of being simple and democratic, however, the state method is slow, cumbersome, and in many states, hopeless, for the following definite reasons: 1. In New Mexico, during the first twenty-five years after adoption of the recent constitution, an amendment 56