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The wage system
Image 13
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Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. The wage system - Image 13. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2520/show/2516.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. (1920). The wage system - Image 13. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2520/show/2516

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921, The wage system - Image 13, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2520/show/2516.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The wage system
Series Title Freedom pamphlets, no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921
Publisher Freedom Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Wages
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location HD4909.K75 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304437~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5016692_012.jpg
Transcript The Wage System. 13 To whom do we owe the trans-Atlantic cable? To the engineer who persisted in declaring that the cable would transmit telegrams, whilst the learned electricians declared that it was impossible? To Maury, the scientist, who advised tire disuse of thick cables and the substitution of one no bigger than a walking stick ? Or, after all, is it to those volunteers, from no one knows where, who spent day and night on the deck of the Great Eastern, minutely examining every yard of cable and taking out the nails that the shareholders of the maritime companies had stupidly caused to be driven through the isolating.coat of the cable to render it useless ? And, in a still wider field, the vast tract of human life, with its joys, its sorrows, and its varied incidents, cannot each of us mention, some one who during his life has rendered him some service so great,, so important, that if it were proposed to value it in money he would be filled with indignation ? This service may have been a word, nothing but a word in season, or it may have been months or years of devotion. Are you going to estimate these, the most important of all services, in labor notes ? " The deeds of each " ! But human societies could not live for two successive generations, they would disappear in fifty years, if each one did not give infinitely more than will be returned to him in money, in "notes " or in civic rewards. It would be the extinction of the race if the mother did not expend her life to preserve her children, if every man did not give some things without counting the cost, if human beings did not give most where they look for no reward. If middle-class society is going to ruin; if we are to-day in a blind alley from which there is no escape without applying axe and torch to the institutions of the past, that is just because we have calculated too much. It is just because we have allowed ourselves to be drawn into giving that we may receive; because we have desired to make society into a commercial company based Upon debit and credit. Moreover, the Collectivists know it. They vaguely comprehend that a society cannot exist if it logically carries out the principle, " To each according to his deeds." . They suspect that the needs (we are not speaking of the whims) of the individual do not always correspond to his deeds. Accordingly, De Paepe tells us :— " This eminently individualistic principle will be tempered by social intervention for the purpose of the education of children and young people (including their maintenance and nurture) and by social organisations for the assistance of the sick and infirm, asylums for aged workers, etc."