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The wage system
Image 11
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Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. The wage system - Image 11. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2520/show/2514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921. (1920). The wage system - Image 11. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2520/show/2514

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921, The wage system - Image 11, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2520/show/2514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The wage system
Series Title Freedom pamphlets, no. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kropotkin, Petr Alekseevich, kni͡azʹ, 1842-1921
Publisher Freedom Office
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Wages
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 15 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location HD4909.K75 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304437~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain: This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_5016692_010.jpg
Transcript The Wage System. 11 exact measure of its value, either of what has been improperly called its "value in exchange" or of its value in use. If we see two individuals, both working for years, for five hours daily, for the community, at two different occupations equally pleasing to them, we can say that, taken all in all, their labors are roughly eijuivalent. But their work could not be broken up into fractions, so that the product of each day, each hour or each minute of the labor of one should be worth the produce of each minute and each hour of that of the other. Broadly speaking, we can say that a man who during his whole life deprives himself of leisure for ten hours daily has given much more to society than he who has deprived himself of but five hours a day, or has not deprived himself of any leisure at all. But we cannot take what one man has done during any two hours and say that this produce is worth exactly twice as much as the produce of one hour's work from another individual, and reward each proportionately. To do this would be to ignore all that is complex in the industry, the agriculture, the entire life of society as it is ; it would be to ignore the extent to which all iiulividual work is the outcome of the former and present labors of society as a whole. It would be to fancy oneself in the Stone Age, when we are living in the Age of Steel- Go into a coal mine and see that man stationed at the huge machine that hoists and lowers the cage. In his hand he holds a lever whereby to check or reverse the action of the machinery. I Ie lowers the handle, and in a second the cage changes the direction of its giddy rush up or down the shaft. His eyes are attentively fixed upon an indicator in front of him which shows exactly the point the cage has reached ; no sooner does it touch the given level than at his gentliest pressure it stops dead short, not a foot above or below the required place. And scarcely are the full trucks discharged or the empties loaded before, at a touch to tire handle, the cage is again swinging up or down the shaft. For eight or ten hours at a time he thus concentrates his attention. Let his brain relax but for an instant, and the ca^'e would fly up and shatter the wheels, break the rope, crush the men, bring all the work of the mine to a stand-still. Let him lose three seconds upon each reverse of the lever and, in a mine with all the modern improvements, the output will be reduced by from twenty to fifty tons a day. Well, is it he who renders the greatest service in the mine ? Oris it, perhaps, that boy who rings from below the signal for the mounting of the cage? Or is it the miner who risks his life every