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Great Britain after the war
Image 73
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 73. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2326.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 73. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2326

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 73, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2326.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 73
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_072.jpg
Transcript GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. 71 purposes—transport and manufacture, heat and light—to the whole kingdom. The Government should be pressed to carry out this plan of " super-power stations." (It is an exercise for the " scientific imagination " to visualise the consequences of such a development upon the health of the community, the distribution of population, manufacturing and agriculture, domestic work, and the cleanliness and beautv of our cities and our countryside.) 4. The Future of Power. (a) Four countries almost entirely monopolise the world's coal resources:—The United Kingdom is estimated to have 150,000,000,000 tons; Germany, 415,000,000,000; the United States, 1,400,000,000,000; China's undeveloped stores are probably greater than those of America, (b) We need not fear the actual exhaustion of our coal supply for a few centuries; what we have to fear is a much earlier exhaustion of that part of the supply which is accessible and easily worked. If we reach that point when we can only get our coal at a markedly greater cost than either Germany or America (? or China), we shall run the risk of declining as an industrial nation. It seems probable, however, that before that stage is reached new sources of power will be found, (c) Mineral oil is already being used in certain directions, though experts do not believe it will overthrow the supremacy of coal, with the notable exception of supplying power for shipping; and it seems likely to be exhausted even sooner than coal. This country has next to no resources in mineral oil (though oil shale is worked in the Lothians), and comparatively meagre resources in water-power, (d) It is not yet practicable to utilise either the sun's heat or the tides, (e) "The energy which we require for our very existence, and which Nature supplies us with but grudgingly and in none too generous measure for our needs, is in reality locked up in immense stores in the matter all around us, but the power to control and use it is not yet ours." (Professor Soddy : "Interpretation of Radium.") What effects will the passing of the coal age and the introduction of new sources of power have upon this country and upon the world? Can we make ourselves prepared as a nation for possible new developments? Have we any duty in this respect to posterity?