Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Great Britain after the war
Image 63
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 63. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2316.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 63. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2316

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 63, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2316.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 63
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_062.jpg
Transcript GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR, 61 labourer shovels 59 tons instead of 16; your bricklayer lays 350 bricks an hour instead of 120, and in general the output per man is at least doubled; and cost of production is, of course, greatly reduced). Dr. Taylor further claims that Scientific Management has solved the " Labour problem " ! "At least 50,000 workmen in the United States are now (1911) employed under this system. ... In place of the suspicious watchfulness and the more or less open warfare which characterises the ordinary types of management, there is universally friendly co-operation between the management and the men." In justice to this new method of production, we should note : —(a) That it is not merely a capitalist dodge,' but claims to be a system basing itself on exact science (e.g., " What constitutes a fair day's work will be a question for scientific investigation instead of a subject to be bargained and haggled over"); (b) that if employers, instead of introducing these methods chivalrously, try to make of them a, mere profit- making device they are not introducing " Scientific Management," but a perversion of it, which, as experience in America has amply proved, can only end in failure. Mr. W. T. Layton goes so far as to say that '' Where this system is worked with proper care for the consideration of the worker's interests, it would seem to be wholly good" ("Capital and Labour," p. 22); (c) that it is illogical to press the argument that "Scientific Management" will make the worker an automaton. Is he not an automaton already? Does not the evolution of our industrial system inevitably involve an increase of automatic labour? Is the worker more of an automaton when he is working rapidly and efficiently than when he is working slowly and clumsily? 2. The Case Against " Scientific Management." Examination shows that the claims made for " Scientific Management " are not borne out by inspection of the establishments where it has been introduced—(See Hoxie's " Scientific Management and Labour")—perhaps because American employers, like those here, have seldom brains enough to carry it out as its inventors designed! Its good points are the insistence on efficient organisation of the factory, use of the best machinery, prevention of any loss of time, and prompt application of labour-saving appliances. All this means only more intelligence in our employers, together with production on the most economical scale with larger factories and regularising demand. It emphasises the importance of (a) discovering, and (b) applying universally the best way of doing each