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Great Britain after the war
Image 56
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 56. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2309.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 56. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2309

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 56, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2309.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 56
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_055.jpg
Transcript CHAPTER VIII. HOW SHALL WE REORGANISE OUR MANUFACTURING PRODUCTION ? A.—Nineteenth Century Manufacture. The machine methods of manufacture introduced by the Industrial Revolution had resulted in an aggregate increase of wealth so prodigious that in spite of '' the enormous share which the possessors of the instruments of industry are able to take from the produce " (which has placed nine-tenths of the wealth in the hands of one-tenth of the population), the lot of the " average man " has, in many respects, unquestionably improved. The skilled artisan of 1918 (as distinguished from the labourer) is often better fed, better clothed, and better housed than were in 1718 or in 1818 many of the employers and professional men; in addition, he has amenities in the way of facilities for travel, newspapers, books, recreation, entertainment, light, warmth, cleanliness, medical attendance and educational opportunity such as even a rich man could not have purchased a century ago. These triumphs of twentieth-century wealth production the modern economist neither belittles nor forgets when he criticises twentieth- century wealth distribution as unjust and socially disastrous; when he denounces as a national disgrace the fact that a quarter of the whole population of the United Kingdom is at all times very little removed from destitution, and when he stigmatises our present output as altogether unworthy, and inadequate to the needs, of a community, the mass of whom may well be deemed more "civilised" than was the aristocracy of the eighteenth century, and all of whom are rapidly becoming more "civilised" still. We must produce more, even if only in order to be able to make that fairer distribution of commodities which Mr. Asquith declares to be a part of our after-war policy. It is, indeed, as plain to the man-in- the-street as-to the economist in his study, that only by constantly producing more commodities and better, at a steadily diminishing "real cost of production," can the people progressively adapt their economic environment to their ever- increasing needs.