Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Great Britain after the war
Image 53
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 53. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 53. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2306

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 53, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 53
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_052.jpg
Transcript GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. 51 competing economic systems, there is no reason to believe- that ours would be the stronger. So far as Great Britain is concerned, our situation would be weakened and more precarious.' (J. A. Ho>bson, writing .before the entry of America into the war.) (Among the neutral markets are such great markets of the future as South America and China. To these must now be added the vast potentialities of Russia.) The student would do well to consider in what sense it can be said that it is impossible for us to " get a living within the confines of our Empire or the Alliance." Consider (a) what raw materials we could not produce; (b) how much we should lose if our manufacturers could not sell to (i.) enemy countries, (ii.) neutrals; (c) how much of our shipping, banking, and insurance business would be destroyed. (c) Can a tariff be imposed which does not raise the cost of living 1—" The method of capture is, however, not to be that of producing the article in question cheaper or better, but in succeeding in inducing the Government to afford means of selling it dearer." (Sir Hugh Bell, "Economic Journal," March, 1916.) ** What is and remains economically invalid is to raise the price to the consumer of the whole of a commodity merely in order to ensure the continuance in industry of that producer who is producing at the ' margin of cultivation.' " (" New Statesman," March 25, 1916.) (Are these two remarks themselves ; economically invalid '' ?) (d) " Where are ice going to get the raw materials for our industries'! " asks the Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of Australia. "As to raw materials," says Sir Leo Chiozza Money, writing in 1914, "our position is far worse than in regard to foods. It is a very small fraction of British work which is done upon British raw materials." (" The Nation's Wealth," p. 60.) Nearly all our cotton comes from America; most of our hides from South America; we cannot do without the American copper or the Spanish quicksilver. Note that the cost of production of our manufactures will be raised whether we tax raw materials coming into this country, or whether we restrict our imports by exporting less ourselves.) (e) So far, no scheme having any show of adequacy has been put forward by the advocates of a tariff. It may well be doubted whether it will be possible to frame one. The