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Great Britain after the war
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 52. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 52. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2305

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 52, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 52
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_051.jpg
Transcript 50 GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR, It is impossible here to consider the fundamental pros and <cons of the tariff question.2 It would seem pertinent, however, to make pAain some of the chief economic dangers and difficulties involved in setting up a tariff. It is the duty of those who desire to make this profound change in our international relations, and therefore in our internal conditions, to prove that the benefits will outweigh the disadvantages and that the difficulties can be overcome. (a) The Loss of Trade with Germany.—In 1913 the British Empire exported to Germany £111,000,000 worth of (mostly manufactured) goads; and imported £108,000,000 worth of .goods. Suppose we succeed in stopping our purchases from Germany, what will happen to the Lancashire and Yorkshire operatives supplying cotton and woollen goods to Germany (over £22,000,000 worth in 1913)? What will'happen to the merchants and shipowners of Harwich, Grimsby, Hull, Newcastle, Leith and Aberdeen? (In 1913, imports to the value of over £11,000,000 and exports to the value of over £13,000,000 passed through Newcastle to or from Germany.) Many similar questions arise. 7 (b) Will Not Germany Capture the Neutral Markets ?—" Her frugal and industrious people will set to work to produce as cheaply as they know how. In what way can we stop her? By refusing to buy? Well, she will take her wares to other markets. The world, all except the Allies, bound, I will suppose, by mutual agreement, to boycott her, will buy her eheap and excellent goods as greedily as they did before. How can we prevent them? . . . No! You cannot capture German trade and you will only do yourself irremediable injury if you try." (Sir Hugh Bell, "Economic Journal," March, 1916.) " Germany would be impelled by the necessity of her situation to woo these neutral markets. She would woo successfully because neutrals would be offended by our hostile tariff. Therefore, not only shall we injure our trade at least as much as that of Germany, but we shall injure it with those neutral countries upon which, alike in peace and war, we are, and must*continue to be, dependent for some of our necessary foods and raw materials. For no mere fiscal or business organisation can enable us to get a living within the confines of our Empire or the Alliance. If, therefore, as the result of our proposed economic alliance, we broke the world into two 2 The student is referred to such books as Prof. Ashley's " The Tariff Problem" and Wm. Smart's "The Return to Protection," and to Prof. Bastable's ' Theory of International Trade" and Dr. Alfred Marshall's "Memorandum on Insular Free Trade." See also Mr. J. A. Hobson's " The New Protectionism." I