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Great Britain after the war
Image 49
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 49. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2302.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2302

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 49, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2302.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_048.jpg
Transcript GBEAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. 47 cultivation, much more production of fruit and timber, the manufacture of toys, optical glass, hard porcelain, and other things that we carelessly abandoned to the Germans. There is considerable plant in the newly erected national factories- (over 100 in number), much of it available for other than its- present uses. (Consider how far the "orthodox" economic arguments against State subsidies to industries remain valid under the abnormal conditions produced by the war.) fc (3) " The Key-Industries."—The economically sound policy for a nation in the long run is to develop within its own borders- as many as possible of the industries fundamental to its health and strength. Which are these? If it is desired to start new industries in order to increase employment for labour and capital in England, would not the real key-industries of peace be (a) the re-housing of the population; (b) the improvement of our system of communications ; (c) the re-organisation of agriculture; (d) the development of the economically all- important "industry" of preserving the health of the community (drainage, water supply, hospitals, medical attendance, school clinics); (e) an increase in the output of our most valuable product, namely, a highly-trained population (more schools, colleges, and other educational buildings; more playgrounds, museums, art galleries, libraries, institutes, etc.)? 4. Further Suggestions for Restoring Our Commercial Position.—Consider the establishment of a Minister of Commerce ; the regulation of the export of capital; State grants-in- aid to socially advantageous industries; the establishment of a publicly controlled banking system; the "commercialising" of our consular service, the development of commercial education—including the thorough teaching of foreign languages; the adoption of the decimal system; improved facilities for the transaction of business abroad and the collection of debts, etc. (Note the proposals of the "Paris Economic Conference in these directions.) 5. Upon What Recovery Depends.—(a) Science—Intelligence—Hard Work—Adaptability. " The trade which we can only capture by throttling Germany with the aid of the British Fleet will not long be ours when normal conditions recur; and then what will become of the capital we are adjured to put into it? How did Germany originally secure this trade? She won it fairly by science, intelligence, hard work, and adaptability. Only by those qualities can we recover and keep it." ("Times," September 24, 1914.)