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Great Britain after the war
Image 48
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 48. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 48. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2301

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 48, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 48
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_047.jpg
Transcript 46 GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. could not provide for the elementary heeds, let alone the more •cultured wants, of our vast population. In order that we may survive, still more in order that we may be prosperous we must secure the importation into this country each jear, not only of a balance of foodstuffs, but also of many millions of pounds' worth of raw materials (cotton, wool, hides rubber, iron ore, copper ore, tin, etc.), by exporting m exchange our manufactured cotton, woollen, iron and steel goods, machinery, ships, and coal. Our business after the war is (a) to recover as far as possible the -custom we have lost; (b) to compensate for oufpermanent losses by increasing our production and finding new markets in our own country m our colonies, in North and South America, and elsewhere.] ^\^ing\C ■ ■ • ThG Shippfng difficttlty is a* aggregation of difficulties the converging point of almost all our pressing economic problems.'' This country in peace-and,^ we have now discovered, a so in war-is absolutely dependent upon its mercantile marine. The utilisation of our shipping TrXCM I— 1 *° SnCure.uthe maxim»m of benefit to the trade of th s country will be the most imperative of our coming commercial needs After the war neutral ship-owners will be in some respects m a more favourable position than our own; and, as we have indicated already we shal? have <S fered great destruction and deterioration of our me chant ship pmg. It has been predicted that, notwith stand™Jts present colossal gains, within a few years of the conclusion of the war the shipping industry will ask for subsidies ™t nf IZ national revenue." Other countries incS!T?r a perhaps the United States, are ^"ng^t'Sltm tttS lishing a State-owned mercantile marine. Has the time come for our foreign trade to outgrow private enterprise aniTe earned on by an industrial British fleet instead oiby Hnes of commercial privateers (as Bernard Shaw puts it)'? (A monograph considering the possibility of the " NitinnnK sation of the Mercantile Marine " is greatfv nee/L ™°"ah- some "Tutorial Class in its fourth £?* Still givenl 2. Developing New Industries as " Substitutes "-The extent to which this can be done depends ,™n lia 7 i conditions and possibilities after the *%£ fis n cetaTv both to make sure of a market, and to establish the "ndustrv There would seem to be possibilities of developing in the United Kingdom, with or without State aid, flax-growlna beet *