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Great Britain after the war
Image 47
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 47. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 47. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 47, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 47
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_046.jpg
Transcript GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. 45 B.—The Outbreak of Peace. 1. Neutral countries, so long as the war lasts, are capturing an ever-growing share of the world's trade. America, though now at last driven into war, seems likely to become predominantly ' the workshop of the world '' in metal: the immense natural resources of Argentina, now indispensable to Europe, will give that country also a period of prosperity; Japan (which, though nominally a belligerent, is freed by its position from absorption in war) is taking the utmost advantage of the opportunity to develop its export trade to Australia, India, and the Pacific; even Spain is gaining at the expense of the belligerent countries. (The longer the war lasts, the more difficult will it become to restore the former conditions and trade routes.) 2. Our Allies will no doubt call for British manufactures and materials to enable them to restore their wasted and exhausted countries. But they will certainly not demand of us what they can conveniently supply for themselves; this new demand, moreover, will be transient only. For a whole generation all the Allied countries will be impoverished, and this means that they will be, on the one hand, poor customers, and, on the other hand, keen competitors. 3. Enemy countries will also be poor customers long after the war; on the other hand, they, even rnore than our Allies, will be fierce trade rivals. (Note that Germany was, after India, actually our largest customer before the war, taking from this country in 1913 no less than £60,000,000 worth of woollen and cotton goods, rubber, machinery, iron and steel goods, etc.) 4. The Credit System upon which modern commerce is established depends upon mutual confidence. It will be long before this is sufficiently restored over the world as a whole to allow of a "normalising" of the international economic relations. For many years, owing to the hostile feelings engendered by war, to the new conditions produced, and perhaps to subsequent internal troubles in various countries, the world will be unable to settle down again into that peaceful state which is essential to highly developed commerce. For instance, London's huge financial business in "accepting for foreign account " is likely to be checked. C—What Can Great Britain Do ? [Note.—What Great Britain cannot do is to become self- sufficing ! With the utmost possible development of agriculture, even supposing this to be practicable or desirable, we