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Great Britain after the war
Image 46
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 46. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2299.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 46. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2299

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 46, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2299.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 46
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_045.jpg
Transcript 44 GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WTAR. abroad (as interest) to the extent of £200,000,000 per annum— which meant that some of the people of this country, without contemporary labour on their own part, enjoyed services and goods to this amount. This value came in as imports. During the war we have sold an enormous quantity of our foreign securities (over £1,000,000,000), thus surrendering our right to receive tribute; worse still, by extensive borrowing abroad, we shall have laid ourselves under the obligation of paying tribute to capitalists in other countries for an indefinite period. When the war is over, we shall not be in a position to "lend" capital to other countries; we shall not even have enough capital for our own requirements, and the Government may prohibit foreign investment so long as the home demand is not fully met. (c) Shipping.—It is estimated that the enemy has destroyed in three years about 5 million tons of our merchant shipping, out of a total tonnage of 18J million tons (in 1914); to this loss must be added the depreciation of our ships interned ir enemy harbours and the deterioration of those in military use. Our shipyards have not yet been able to make good this loss during the war; and we have not built to replace those vessels normally " obsolescing " with the lapse of years. (In 1914, we launched a total tonnage of 1,683,553.) In proportion to the length of the war and the activity of the enemy miners, raiders, and submarines, we shall find ourselves, when peace comes, short of our requirements by some millions of tons. The shortage will be increased by the fact that all countries will have similarly suffered. (d) Finance.—London's geographical position has helped to make it the financial centre of the world; but, despite this, during the war, New York has gone some way towards supplanting it, at least, so far as Canada and South America are concerned. (Note that if we refuse to buy from, or try to shut out goods from Germany, German exporters wiil decline to take payments from their other customers in bills on London, and may insist on having bills on New York.) (e) Prestige.—" This will be a different country when the war is over in more ways than one. We shall find ourselves deprived of the advantages of the prestige of the past, which have given us the unique position in commerce and industry we have enjoyed up to now, largely because we were in the field and our rivals could not come in." (Lord Haldane.) '