Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Great Britain after the war
Image 45
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 45. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2298.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 45. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2298

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 45, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2298.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 45
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_044.jpg
Transcript PART II.—RECONSTRUCTION. CHAPTER VII. HOW SHALL WE REORGANISE OUR FOREIGN TRADE? A.—The Effects of the War upon our,Commerce. (Note.—The subject matter of Foreign Trade is so complex that it is impossible to elaborate it in sufficient detail. The student is recommended, as a preliminary, to make a careful study, with the help of a commercial atlas, of the overseas trade of this country before the war. Only by so doing can be appreciate the effects the war has already had and estimate what its ultimate consequences are likely to be.) 1. What we are Losing during the War. (a) Export Trade.—In 1913, exports of British goods were valued at 525 million pounds; in 1915, at 385 millions only. The figures so far available indicate that our export trade may be somewhat greater in 1918 than in 1915. Thus, provided the war is over at no distant date, it may seem that we have " lost " during the war less than one-fourth of our total export trade. Making allowance for the rise in prices, the loss is, in quantity, considerably more than this—perhaps nearly one-half. (In which of our exports, and to which <x)untries, has this decline occurred?) (b) Lending to Other Countries.—Our foreign and colonial investments before the war have been estimated at £4,000,000,000 sterling. (Every year before the war we were lending to other countries some £200,000,000.) These accumulated investments gave us the power to exact ■* tribute '' from