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Great Britain after the war
Image 44
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 44. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2297.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 44. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2297

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 44, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2297.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 44
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_043.jpg
Transcript 42 GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. « < « i always by women. (See Webb : Industrial Democracy on The Exclusion of Women.") Note,this statement from " The (1916) Labour Year Book " : The fixing of a rate for men and women, which shall be in equitable proportion to any less degree of physical endurance, skill or responsibility exacted from the woman, or to any additional strain thrown on the man, and which shall neither exclude women on the one side nor blackleg men on the other, is one of the most delicate problems with which the Trade Unions are faced." Unless this principle (c) is adopted, and the woman's earnings are made closely equivalent to her lesser value to the employer, the bulk of either the men or the women may presently find themselves automatically excluded from any province which both are qualified to enter. (Can this precise adjustment be obtained except by a carefully differentiated Minimum Wage Law? Without real equality of cost of labour to the employer, will he not always prefer one sex to the other? Given real equality of labour cost, which sex would he prefer?) \ / ORGANISATION. In 1914 only 356,963 women were registered as Trade Unionists—270,000 of these in the textile trades. In 1915 the total had risen to 400,919; and it may be estimated for 1918 at 500,000. Women are exceedingly difficult to organise for various causes, some of them irremediable; but the main difficulty, as with the unskilled male workers, is probably the low- ness of their earnings (estimated at 10s. 10Jd. on the average in 1912, as compared with the man's average of £1 5s. 9d.). For the most part (except in the National Union of Railwaymen, the Railway Clerks' Association, and a few others) men have resisted the admission of women in their specialised Unions.1 On the other hand, the Unions of general labourers have, in nearly all cases, welcomed the accession of women. "Probably there is no adequate solution; but clearly the danger can be reduced to the most manageable dimensions by getting the women into the Trade Union Movement. If this is not done while the war lasts, men and women alike will suffer for it on the declaration of peace." (Cole, " Labour in War-time.") {*) Note that the principal Trade Union endeavouring to organise women as such—the National Federation of Women Workers—is exposed to serious competition for members from such mixed general societies as the Workers' Union,, the National Union of General Workers (lately the Gasworkers' Union), etc. a \1