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Great Britain after the war
Image 23
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 23. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2276.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2276

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 23, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2276.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_022.jpg
Transcript GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. 21 Consider the effects of the war upon the four '' agents of production " :— 1. Land. The war promises not to have deprived us of an inch of soil; it will have brought more land under cultivation; it has not robbed us of our coal or water-power o^ uur iailways or our seaports. 2. Labour. It is possible that, through death, maiming, and disease, the war may cost us, from first to last, over a million of men. (This is not as many deaths as occur in the United Kingdom in eighteen months, but of such normal deaths a large proportion are those of infants and old people. The war loss is wholly of men in the full vigour of productive life.) The number of persons "gainfully employed" in the United Kingdom is about 20 millions. Of this force we shall have lost by the war, perhaps, 1 in 20, or about 5 per cent. We could make good this falling off in production if we adopted any one of the following expedients: (a) Improve our health and vigour to the extent of doing the equivalent of half-an-hour more work every day—most of us could do that; (b) use more machinery, to the extent of 21 machines where before there were only 20 ; (c) diminish the ' time lost ' at the factory or the mine by juist one day in each month ; (d) put just that little extra intensity into the -work that would turn out 21 articles each day instead of 20— perhaps by actually shortening the working week, as Lord Leverhulme proposes, to 36 'hours—less time but more work! If we chose to reduce the Infantile Mortality of the nation— which is quite within the power of the Government—from the level of Lancashire to that of London, from the level of Shore- ditch to that of Hampstead, we should make good all the mere numerical loss through the war within 20 years. If we chose to prevent tuberculosis—again, as regards at least half the cases, quite within the power of the Government—we could make good the loss of productive workers through the war within 20 years. 3. Capital. Those who are pessimistic about the future derive their pessimism largely from the anticipated shortage of material capital. To some extent we have been " living upon our capital " during the war; we ha/e, moreover, put nothing by: