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Great Britain after the war
Image 8
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Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. Great Britain after the war - Image 8. 1916. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2261.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947. (1916). Great Britain after the war - Image 8. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2261

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947, Great Britain after the war - Image 8, 1916, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2338/show/2261.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Great Britain after the war
Alternative Title Great Britain after the war, by Sidney Webb and Arnold Freeman; being facts and figures, quotations and queries, suggestions and forecasts, designed to help individual inquirers and study circles in considering what will happen after war with regard to trade, employment, wages, prices, trade unionism, co-operation, women's labour, foreign commerce, the railways, the coal supply, education, taxation, etc. Dedicated to the Workers' educational association
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Webb, Sidney, 1859-1947
Publisher G. Allen and Unwin
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1916
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Economic policy
  • Economics
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United Kingdom
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 80 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location HC256.2.P27
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302906~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_781144_007.jpg
Transcript 6 GREAT BRITAIN AFTER THE WAR. in the form of statutory minima designed to protect in varying ways and degrees the bulk of the citizen-producers from the more extreme pressures of private employment, to such an extent that the fixing of minimum wages, maximum hours, adequate conditions of sanitation and safety, etc., have come more and more to be looked upon as basic safeguards on which it is for the community as a whole to insist. Supplementing, on the other hand, the beneficent activities of tihe democratic Co-operative Stores and Wholesale Societies, the National and Municipal Government has become, in the aggregate, the most extensive direct provider of things that the community needs, whether housing, education, medical service, sanitation, water, -light, superannuation allowances, means of communication, parks, entertainments, libraries—even, in particular cases, clothing, milk and meals! So irresistible have these newer ' collectivist " tendencies, whether governmental or co-operative, 'become in recent years that it had come to seem almost inevitable that the future would lie with them rather than with those which are individualist and competitive. Hardly any well-informed student of the last centurv, noting the growing subordination of private to public interests in the means of life, and the concurrent emergence of the mass of the people into relative comfort and freedom, could fail—before the war—to take an optimistic view of the future of Democracy in Great Britain. Reflecting in the early summer of 1914 (let us say) upon probable further developments, such an observer would have looked forward to a continuance of that progress in economic emancipation which we are now realising to be the necessary corollary of political democracy; to the gradual securing to every member of the community, as a necessary basis for individual development, of as high a " minimum " in the Standard of Life as the productive energies of the community would permit: to the winning for every individual of a "maximum of freedom " of self-expansion, limited no longer by a heritage of individual poverty, but only by social resources ; to a steady progress in the acquisition for communal utilisation of all those forms of " economic rent" which have long been public in their nature in the eyes of our economic treatises and our Bibles, though not in our property law; and to the eventual culmination of these tendencies, however far off might have seemed the goal, in that M equal participation of all in the benefits of combined labour"—involving not a pedantic identity, either qualitative or quantitative, but an essential parity of economic scope—which John Stuart Mill in his day