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The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade
Image 74
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Lenin, Vladimir I.. The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 74. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I.. (1920). The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 74. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2077

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I., The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 74, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir I.
Publisher Contemporary Publishing Association
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Proletariat
  • Kautsky, Karl
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 128 pages; 17 cm
Original Item Location HX314.L3562 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304409~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
Note Translation of Proletarskai︠a︡ revoli︠u︡t︠s︡ii︠a︡ i renegat Kautskiĭ.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 74
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12408672_073.jpg
Transcript writing his "Road to Power"), he was insisting upon the inevitability of a revolution in connection with the war, and spoke abobut the approach of an era of revolutions. The Basel Manifesto of 1912 definitely speaks of a proU. tarian revolution in connection with that very Imperialist war between the Germans and the British Coalition, which actually broke out in 1914. But in 1918, when these revolutions began in connection with the war, Kautsky, instead of pointing out their inevitable character and reflecting upon and thinking out to the end the revolutionary policy and the methods of preparing for revolution, sets out to represent the reformist tactics of the .Mensheviks as Internationalism. Is not this a piece of apostasy? Kautsky praises the Mensheviks for having insisted upon efficiency in the army, and he blames the Bolsheviks for having increased the disorganization of the army, which had been growing even without their intervention. This means praising reformism and submission to the Imperialist bourgeoisie, blaming the revolution and abjuring it. For the maintenance of the fighting efficiency of the army meant, under Kerensky, its maintenance under the bourgeois (albeit republican) command. Everybody knows, and the events have proved it, that this republican army was preserving what may be called a Korniloff spirit, thanks to the reactionary attitude of the command. The bourgeois officers could not help being of a Korniloff irit; they could not help gravitating towards Imperial- i and towards a forcible suppression of the proletariat. To leave as before all the foundations of the Imperialist war, all the foundations of bourgeois dictatorship intact, to correct details and to improve the little minor defects by means of so-called reforms—this is what, in practice, the Menshevik policy amounted to. On the other hand, ,not a single great revolution ever 1 0r could do without a so-called disorganization of th °rmy, the strongest instrument of support of the old ( 72 ) a