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The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade
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Lenin, Vladimir I.. The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 56. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2059.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I.. (1920). The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 56. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2059

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I., The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 56, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2059.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir I.
Publisher Contemporary Publishing Association
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Proletariat
  • Kautsky, Karl
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 128 pages; 17 cm
Original Item Location HX314.L3562 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304409~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
Note Translation of Proletarskai︠a︡ revoli︠u︡t︠s︡ii︠a︡ i renegat Kautskiĭ.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 56
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12408672_055.jpg
Transcript sort Kautsky, the historian, has never heard tOiat urn- versal suffrage yields sometimes petty bourgeois and at other times counter-revolutionary parliaments. Kautsky, the Marxist historian, has never heard that the method of elections and the form of democracy are one thing, and the class-content of a given institution is another thing. Yet this question about the class-content of the Constituent Assembly was raised by me, and answered in my thes Possibly my answer was not correct. Nothing would have been so welcome to me as a Marxist criticism of my analysis by an outsider. Instead of writing silly phrases (there are plenty such phrases in Kautsky's book) about somebody, somehow, preventing a criticism of Bolshevism, he ought to have set out to make such criticism. But the point is just that he has no such criticism to offer. He does not even raise the question about the class character of the Soviets on the one hand, and of the Consituent Assembly on the other. Hence there is no possibility of discussing with Kaulisky. All that remains for me to do is to show to the reader why Kautsky cannot be called by any other name than a turncoat. The divergence between the Soviets and the Constituent Assembly has its history which even an historian who does not share the point of view of class-war could not ignore. Kautsky refuses even to touch upon this history. Kautsky has concealed from his German readers the universally known fact (which is now also suppressed by rabid Mensheviks) that the divergence between the Soviets and the "State" (that is, the bourgeois) institutions had existed even at the time of the predominance of the Mensheviks, that is, between the middle of March and October, 1917. Kautsky, in substance, takes up the position of an advocate of conciliation and co-operation between the proletariat and the bourgeoisie. However much Kautsky may deny this, it is a fact borne out by his whole book. We ought not to have suppressed the Constituent Assembly- tnat means, we ought not to have fought out the fight ( 54 ) I