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The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade
Image 49
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Lenin, Vladimir I.. The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 49. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2052.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I.. (1920). The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2052

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Lenin, Vladimir I., The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade - Image 49, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2136/show/2052.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The proletarian revolution and Kautsky the renegade
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir I.
Publisher Contemporary Publishing Association
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Proletariat
  • Kautsky, Karl
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 128 pages; 17 cm
Original Item Location HX314.L3562 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304409~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
Note Translation of Proletarskai︠a︡ revoli︠u︡t︠s︡ii︠a︡ i renegat Kautskiĭ.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12408672_048.jpg
Transcript is the advance guard, the organizer and the leader of the oppressed masses, must not become a State organization! From a practical point of view, the idea that the Soviets are necessary as fighting organizations, but must not become State institutions, is even more absurd than it is in the theoretical respect. Even in peaceful times, when the situation is not revolutionary, the mass struggle of the workers against the capitalists—for instance, a mass strike—causes passion to run very high on either side, provokes great bitterness and rage, the bourgeoisie constantly insisting that it must remain "master in its own house," etc. But in the time of revolution, when political life reaches, one may say, the boiling point, an organization like the Soviets, which embraces all workers, all in* dustries, and ultimately also all soldiers, and the entire laboring and poor population of the villages, must inevitably, in the course of the struggle, and by the mere logic of attack and defence, bring the questions of power to a direct* issue. All attempts to take up a middle position and to "reconcile" the proletariat and the bourgeoisie, appear then as acts of imbecility and prove a miserable failure. Such has been the fate of the efforts of Martoff and his friends in Russia, and such will inevitably also be the fate of similar attempts in Germany and other countries, if the Soviets should succeed in striking root, in gaining strength, and in linking up with one another. To tell the Soviets: fight, but do not take over the entire State authority, do not become State institutions, its tantamount to preaching the co-operation of classes and "social peace" between the proletariat and the bourgeoisie. The bare idea is preposterous that such a position amid passionate strife could lead to anything else than a disgraceful collapse. It is, however, the eternal fate of Kautsky to sit between two stools. He puts on an air as if he did not agree with the opportunists on any theoretical question, but in practice he agrees with them on everything that is essential (i. e., on everything chat pertains to the revolution). ( 47 )