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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 31
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 31. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1997.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 31. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1997

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 31, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1997.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_030.jpg
Transcript 29 PETITIONS PRESENTED TO THE SPANISH PARLIAMENT FOR THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY. As we do not wish to unduly extend this pamphlet, we only reproduce three of the innumerable addresses which have recently been presented to the Spanish Parliament from communities in ail parts of the country, praying for the immediate and uncon di- tional abolition of slavery. On the 18th November, Senor Ramos Carrion presented to the Spanish Congress the following address, signed by a considerable number of the inhabitants of Malaga, amongst whom were a large number of provincial deputies, members of the corporation, lawyers, proprietors, and artizans of that city :—" To the Congress of Deputies of the Spanish nation,—It would be incredible, if facts were not at hand to prove it, that, after a lapse of fifty years since the Spanish Government bound itself by solemn treaties to suppress the infamous and immoral traffic in slaves, slavery should still continue in the colonial possessions of Spain ; if not with the same intensity as in former times, at least with sufficient strength to resist and render impotent the incessant efforts of so many generous-hearted, humane men, who have stoutly fought against this ill-omened brand of ignominy on the noble Spanish nation. The inhuman greed, the sordid interests of a handful of wretched men, notwithstanding their apparent power, have sufficed to set at naught treaties, laws, justice, morality, religion, our national honour and dignity, and our good name, for each and every one of these is assailed and insulted by the slavery, which, notwithstanding all that may be said to the contrary, is sustained in our colonial possessions, without the existence of a single reason which can even attenuate this great crime, for a crime it is of the deepest dye to uphold and protect that which the laws, human and divine, condemn as the most flagrant violation of the eternal principles of justice and charity. It would be idle to occupy the attention of the Congress with an exposure of the arguments and facts which proved the heinousness of slavery ; the human conscience repels it with indignation, and it is impossible to conceive a man of intelligence and morality even who could accept it even as a temporary arrangement, much less as a fixed principle. But even supposing that such men exist, surely they are not to be found in the Congress of the Spanish nation in 1872. In a slave State they might be found, but by no means could they take their seats in the Parliament of a free nation, and especially during a regime so eminently democratic as that proclaimed by the code of 1869. Shame on the man who, professing liberal ideas, and boasting of being a moral Christian, could oppose the smallest bar, create the slightest obstacle, or raise the faintest objection against the most complete and immediate abolition of slavery. There