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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 28
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 28. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1994.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1994

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 28, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1994.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_027.jpg
Transcript 26 Colonial Minister is not in his place to hear it, that the theory I propounded the other day with respect to the principle which ought to guide our colonial policy, is not such an exotic doctrine, worked out in the solitude of a scientific dreamer, as thoy think. I said that our relation to our colonies ought to be that of a guardian, such as a greater state should be towards a smaller one, in the matter of civilization ; and in no interested spirit, but only to forward it on the road, and let its emancipation be as rapid and happ}7 as the just and tender paternity of nations could make it. This is surely not the theory of a scientific dreamer, bereft of practical sense, for I have done no more than humbly copy it from the President of the Committee for drawing up the reply7 to the King's Speech, who, when Minister, stood up in this House and advocated the emancipation of the colonies. I have done no more than follow the teachings of Senor Moret, another Radical Minister, who on bringing forward the draft constitution, prepared so patriotically by Senor Becerra, upheld also the theory and doctrine of emancipation. The ideas of these Ministers, with whom I presumed Senor Ruiz Zorilla (Prime Minister) would coincide, were no vain theories; they were merely declarations of facts accomplished by other nations, who, by force of their common sense, are making themselves still masters of the continent. In the vears 1852 and 1854, Lord Russell advocated the doctrine of the emancipation of the colonies, and you are aware of the present organization of Canada and Australia. I, who am not a practical man, I, who have not hardly enough sense to live, I, who live in Utopia, and yet nevertheless take upon myself to advise statesmen, challenge the Prime Minister to point out a single Colonial Minister out of Spain who does not uphold the theory of colonial emancipation, and I have now finished on that point. It appears that I have been rather hard in what I said the other day, when speaking of the Havana Volunteers, distinguishing always, however, between those who have done nothing but perturb the already bad administration, dishonour our name, and commit barbarous crimes, and the Volunteers ot Cuba, who it appears have really done some service. But, gentlemen, the judgment I formed was certainly not one I would have given utterance to without good data. Look how unfortunate I am. I could not be original even in this : incapable of being other than a poor copyist, without power to draw the picture myself, the hard words I used were those of a journal favourable to the present administration, which I will read. Speaking of the Volunteer party, it says: "' These insurrectionists are as irreconcilable as the others, and are not less ferocious. Their flag is that of an exaggerated espanolismo which covers their real object, which is only to plunder the country at their pleasure. They wish to preserve slavery to enable them to continue building up fortunes with the slave trade; they hate freedom of the press because it is an impertinent informer of all the bad tricks which they have been accustomed to