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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 20
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 20. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1986.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 20. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1986

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 20, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1986.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_019.jpg
Transcript 18 they possess, at the points of their bayonets, a magic alchemy that will turn their notes into sterling gold. I hardly know wThether I need go into the question of the Asiatics in Cuba, since no one is ignorant of the sort of treatment they receive. They are looked upon not as colonists, but bondmen, and it is only too notorious that the most iniquitous means are employed to make the coolies re-engage when their time expires. All this is well known, and, although I shudder to think it true, I see it treated as such by all the foreign, and part of the Spanish press. Sinister rumours come of rapid fortunes made by the sole means of incarcerating the unfortunate coolies in prison, by virtue of secret orders, and only releasing them when they purchase their certificates for six or eight ounces of gold (£27) Spain must lose all—all without exception, if we continue blindly, obstinately to tread the unhappy course we are following. We have lost the rich surplus of the Cuban estimates, and want twelve millions of dollars per year to cover the war deficit. We have lost in the Antilles thousands and thousands of brave soldiers; Cuba is the tomb of the Spanish youth, the grave of the Spanish army. What have we gained, after all, by wresting from the Cubans their inborn rights, which, try as we may, must still be theirs ? We have won the right of being held up as the most inhuman people in all civilization. And yet tbe speech from the throne intimates that we should carry war through Cuba as the Duke of Alva did through Flanders, and can anybody believe for a moment that in the nineteenth century such a proceeding would have a different result from which it had in the reign of Philip II. ? If we have to carry on a war of extermination, let me remind you that when Spain was the most powerful nation of the earth, and the sun never set on its dominions, we lost Flanders through our cruelty. How shall we hope, then, in this age of humanity, to hold Cuba by fire and sword, and not by right and justice? The system of extermination in this age only injures the exterminator; instead of saying, as you propose to say, in effect, "Cubans, lay down your arms, and we, who have never fulfilled any of the promises we have made you, will give you back the rights that we could never deprive you of," we should say—"Cubans, here are your rights, now lay down your arms, and let us embrace and be brothers living happily together in the bosom of our national unity." Ah ! Gentlemen of the Government, if you did this; if you did this, Gentlemen of the Radical party, you would see how soon the pacification of Cuba would follow so generous an action. But if you do not, woe to the poor remnant of our colonial power ! Woe to the Spanish commerce the day that our ships forget the only course they know by heart; the course that leads to the Antilles. On the 16th October, 1872, Senor Cala said—" There (Cuba), in a Spanish province, and with Spanish subjects (I am not sure whether