Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 19
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 19. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1985.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 19. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1985

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 19, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1985.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_018.jpg
Transcript 17 The slaveowner of to-day can tranquilly live on the toil of his negroes, in virtue of a Spanish Act organizing slavery7—a law organizing a crime. Former Governments have attempted to create a colonial debt, but they have never thought of dispensing with the Parliamentary authority to allow them to do so. I deplore to see that Senor Gasset y Artime, the Colonial Minister, is of a different opinion. What debt is created, and for what purpose ? A debt of 60 million dollars—30 millions down, and 30 millions in prospective, and this to reimburse the holders of the Bank of Havana for the notes they had issued to reimburse those people who, on their own personal and immediate responsibility, created the debt for the purpose of maintaining the statu quo, dragging on the war still longer, depriving their neighbours of their inborn rights, and upholding slavery. These very people who, very recently imported two shameful consignments of African slaves they who still hold in their possession the bonds of Narciso Lopez, and who were formerly such bitter enemies to Spain and such ardent advocates of separation during the time that slavery existed in the south of the United States, but who are now such friends of Spain because she consents to uphold slavery. These very people, who still cry, " Long live Alfonso XII. !" and favour, or wish to favour, the AlfonsisL plans, since they believe, incorrectly, that the Moderado party would preserve slavery7. These people, who try their hardest to prolong the war, because they think that our modern Dukes of Alva will continue their cherished slaverv so lon^ as the war lasts: who are constant only in their desire to perpetuate the black monopoly, and are only steadfast in their efforts to do so. To recompense, I repeat, these people who come to Spain, crying out for three favours— first, that we should send half of our army to Cuba ; second, that Spain should burthen herself with the debt which the merchants, bankers and planters of Havana and Matanzas have contracted on their own responsibility; and, thirdly, that the social question shall not be interfered with. The question of the Cuban debt is a personal one. The loan was contracted in distinct infraction of the Charter of the Bank of Havana ; in violation, as I have already stated, and will repeat a hundred times, of all the laws governing the matter, and in utter disregard of all arguments to the contrary, on the responsibility of these estate-holders, capitalists, and merchants of Havana and Matanzas, who now want to shift this personal debt on to the Spanish nation, reasoning thus:—"If the rebellion triumphs, wre lose our monopoly and our negroes, and if the generous ideas of the Abolitionist Society make headway in Spain we also lose our monopoly and our negroes ; our only course, therefore, is to move heaven and earth for a continuance of the statu quo:1 I grieve, indeed, to have to mention one thing which appears only too certain, namely7, that the financial question in Cuba is really the question of the bad volunteers—I do not refer to the good ones—the bad volunteers of Havana, who say that *