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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 18
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 18. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1984.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 18. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1984

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 18, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1984.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_017.jpg
Transcript 16 these freedmen into slaves, and their number has already reached the- respectable total of 50,000 men or more. What, then, does the Government intend to do with these 50,000 slaves, and why does Spain keep free men in slavery, thus making slaves of men that are free, instead of giving freedom to slaves ? There is no possible way of escape from Article 5 of the Preparatory Act for the abolition of slavery carried by Senor Moret through the Constituent Cortes. Tbe article admits of no doubt, and declares that all slaves who from any cause belong to the State shall be free. Now, gentlemen of the Government, gentlemen ot the Radical party, answer me, in the name of humanity, since you cannot escape from the dilemma; the slaves either belong to the rebels or to the Government. If they belong to the rebels they are free, and have been so since April, 1869; and if they belong to Spain, they obtained their manumission in July, ]870, in virtue of the Act I have quoted. What does the noble Spanish Abolitionist Society say to this? O! gentlemen, a fact like this cannot be discussed, but demands a thousand tongues to proclaim it alone, every instant, through the length and breadth of our land. The Spanish Abolitionist Society is right in its plea. If the backbone of the rebellion is, as we are told, the negroes and fugitive Chinese, how can it be hoped that these men, now in the enjoyment of liberty, will willingly return to the estates and bend their backs once more for the knout of the slave- driver ? Is it not rather to be feared that there will sweep down upon us with the rapidity and violence of the tropical hurricane, a fearful hour of catastrophe never to be remedied ? And yet the Colonial Minister told us last session that he did not think of abolishing slavery ! Formerly parents could purchase the manumission of an unborn child for $25, and for double that sum could emancipate a child under the age of one year : this right is now denied them, and they are subjected to a servitude which is an opprobrious aggravation of the old slavery. Formerly females of 12 and males of 14 could contract marriage by permission of their owners ; this they are not now allowed to do under the ages of 14 and 18 respectively, in violation of the law on civil marriages. Formerly the master had no claim on the freedmen except to 100 gold maravedis on his death, and to some assistance in case of indigence on the part of the master, but now the latter can speculate or do as he likes with all the earnings of a freedman until he reaches his eighteenth year, and a half of his earnings until he arrives at the age of twenty-two. Formerly the guardianship of children belonged to the parents, now it belongs to the slave owner. Formerly the owner of slaves born since 1817, the year when the treaty was signed with England, was at any time exposed to the intervention of a humane authority, which might say, " Set that negro at liberty, pay the labourer his hire, and recompense *him and his chi - dren for the harm you have done them in depriving them of their freedom, whilst you answer for your crime as a pirate and a slaver.'