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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 13
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 13. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1979.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 13. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1979

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 13, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1979.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_012.jpg
Transcript 11 y of the Cortes Constituentes has on its conscience a great sin of omission,, arising from a transcendental error with regard to our duties as true Spaniards. I allude to the fact of its having kept silent with regard to the Cuban policy. Only a very few deputies, in accord writh our esteemed colleagues, now and then broke the funereal silence, and we were recompensed by seeing our speeches condemned to the flames by the patriotic tolerance of the volunteers—of the bad volunteers of Havana—for I do not speak of the good ones. I was fortunate enough, it appears, only to have my speeches burnt in an obscure cafe, but against some of my worthy, estimable, and patriotic companions, torrents of slander and abuse were let loose in a way so vile and implacable that it would have been terrible had it not been supremely ridiculous. The minority were afraid of the accusations which at that epoch were directed by the pirates, slavemasters, and slavedealers against all of us who attempted to advocate right and justice, and that terrible silence, held, unjustly, as implying complicity and consent gave enormous encouragement to the traffickers in negro flesh and blood, and caused an exacerbation of the evil, then impossible to foresee. Cuba is sunk under an inundation of abuses, and a phis ultra is impossible, unless, indeed, the extermination ot the whole of the islanders be decreed, as has been proposed and solicited in the interest of humanity from Cuba itself. Oh! if we had then raised the voice of true patriotism and true humanity, every hour, every moment, and at every opportunit3r, perhaps the evil would never have reached the proportions which it now has; and we should soon have got over the fright of false accusations, which, however calumnious, do not perturb our sleep, nor are threats of assassination under the dome of the church always carried into effect, as witness our friend Sr. Don Francisco Diaz Quintero, whom we see here alive and well. If, then, a mistaken idea of our duties as Spaniards has imposed silence upon us hitherto, we cannot, will not, must not, for an instant longer, allow ourselves to be considered accomplices of the atrocities which are committed and the crimes of lese-humanity which are perpetrated in our colonies. Cuba is groaning under the scourge of arbitrary power ; there is no law, no Code, no Constitution; the principles of modern law are trampled in the dust, and the ancient laws are disregarded. Children are immolated, judgment is passed on the dead, the innocent suffer for the guilty, human ears are fried and eaten, the only power is brute force, the vile greed of bad officials, and the infamy of pirates and slavers (Murmurs.) Ithink there will be sufficient tolerance in the Senate to hear my opinion. I come here to proclaim what I feel, after deeply pondering it in the sanctuary of my own conscience. I hold with the doctrine laid down by one of our most profound thinkers—an honour to the Republican ranks—in a recent debate, and I, like that great Spanish statesman and all the politicians