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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 11
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 11. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1977.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 11. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1977

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 11, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1977.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_010.jpg
Transcript wish to express to you, my lords, how deeply I deplore the trouble I am giving you by occupying your attention so long. Such is my unwillingness to take up the time of the Chamber that I have never spoken here, except to fulfil a duty to my party, or when the vote of my colleagues has made it incumbent on me to do so ; and I have a special reason for this unwillingness, since I believe that the power of persuasion depends much more on the frame of mind of the hearer than on the foxce and reasoning of the speaker. How easily can we be convinced of anything that tends to what we ourselves desire ; and, on the other hand, with what tedium and annoyance do we listen to those who talk to us of subjects against which we feel an aversion ! So true is this, indeed, that we often close our ears for fear that our opinions should vacillate, and we should be unable, in conscience, to refuse our assent to a contrary opinion, disliked rather from the effect of the surroundings amongst which we live than from the result of mature deliberation or well-founded exercise of the will. Since, therefore, I have unfortunately been seated on the Opposition benches, I may perhaps at times have thought to convince by the evident force of the reasons I had to adduce, but never to conquer in debate, nor oppose opinions with mere sophism. This therefore being the case, when questions of principle alone were at issue, what have I not to fear now that I have, against my inclination, to speak of the atrocities committed in our colonies, " envenomed with cruel hatreds and furious passions " according to the now famous expression of the Colonial Minister ? What have I not to fear now that I have to address myself to gentlemen uninformed on the subject, for, in truth, if anyone is ignorant of what goes on in Cuba and Porto Rico, it is the Spanish peninsula. And would to God I had to struggle against nothing but ignorance on colonial questions. But, unfortunate^, the hard-wrung blood of negroes, in the form of golden ingots, has been sent from the colonies hither, more to pervert public opinion than to obscure the light. What have I not to fear when, under the name of love for Spain, they send our Captains-Generals back to us again ? Spain does not govern in Cuba, for if she did she would not suffer innocent children to be shot down as they have been. Most of you, my lords, are fathers. Picture to yourselves, in your mind's eye, your sons being absent from the University of Havana, in consequence of the absence of a professor, going in a spirit of boyish lighthcartedness to a neighbouring cemetery to play. Imagine for this irreverence, and a certain want of confidence that existed in the authorities (which I now purposely pass over), a ferocious and riotious mob taking your sons prisoners, subjecting them to a Council of War, accusing them falsely of injuring the tombs, whose glass fronts still remain intact! Imagine, again, the Council of War acquitting them, and this savage