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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Image 5
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The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 5. 1872. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1971.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1872). The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 5. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1971

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament - Image 5, 1872, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/2003/show/1971.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament
Alternative Title The Cuban question in the Spanish parliament. (Debate in the Cortes.); Extracts from speeches made by Senores Diaz Quintero, Benot, Salmeron and others
Contributor (Local)
  • Macías, Juan M.
Publisher Anglo-American Times Press
Date 1872
Description Contributor roles: Macías, Juan Manuel (editor)
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Cuba
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location F1785.M16 1872
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304410~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Public Domain
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3279695_004.jpg
Transcript I)y the Cuban revolution, and which endows it with especial interest and importance. After more than half a century of representations and petitions to the Spanish Government to put an end to the African slave trade; after superhuman exertions on the part of the most distinguished men in the colony to substitute free for slave or forced labour, exertions, be it remembered, always rewarded by the Spanish Government in Cuba with imprisonment and exile, the first words pronounced by the Cuban patriots and inscribed on their flag were to proclaim equal liberty and citizenship for blacks and whites ; thus demonstrating that their own wrongs and misfortunes had not blinded them to the oppression and misery of that other disinherited race which the Spanish system keeps in bondage, notwithstanding the most sacred pledges to the contrary and in spite of the murmurs and remonstrances of Christianity and civilization. Doubly just, therefore, doubly noble and worthy of the sympathy of all free men is a cause supported on such bases and aiming at such high ends. England, the country of Clarkson and Wilberforce, cannot and should not remain longer an indifferent spectator of the fratricidal struggle which is staining with blood the erst prosperous towns and fertile fields of Cuba;—on the one side justice and the vindication of the most holy human rights, and on the other all the bad passions bred of ambition, cruelty and avarice. The right of England to interfere is, it is true, limited, but it should be none the less efficacious and coercive since it is founded on solemn treaties and agreements which neither require enumeration nor comment. To bring this influence to bear, England need not have recourse to force ; an explicit and firm intimation would suffice on her part that she would no longer consent that these treaties should remain a dead letter, and a standing joke be made of the eternal delays with which Spain has hitherto managed to elude her obligations, and maintain in slavery thousands of human beings who are morally and legally under the protection of the .British Government. A perusal of the official documents relative to the matter for the year 1871, which have been laid before the British Parlia-