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Why I side with the Social Revolution
Image 65
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Marchand, René, 1888-. Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 65. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/163.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-. (1920). Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 65. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/163

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-, Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 65, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/163.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I side with the Social Revolution
Alternative Title Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marchand, René, 1888-
Publisher Publishing office of the Communust International
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Saint Petersburg, Russia
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 85 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.17.M3713 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304506~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Note Translation of: Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 65
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25190168_064.jpg
Transcript 63 C5 effective „ destructions" undoubtedly were bein accomplished by the "revolutionary workers and peasants, supported, as I have explained, by the Russian Bolshevik. Government). These words, „in Ukraine" made clear moreover,—in the clearest possible manner the exclusive anti- germ an aim of M. de Vertamond's mission. The latter, in point of cynicism, was in not in the least behind Lieutenant Ritey. He declared- that he attempted, but without success, to blow up the bridge of Tcherepovetz (which would have had equally tragic consequences for Petrograd, Tcherepovetz being on the line Zvanka- Vologda-Viatka). Afterwards he expatiated on the measures which lie had taken in order to effect the destruction of rolling stock and obstruct the principal railway lines. He explained specially that he had succeeded in obtaining valuable cooperation amongst the railway workers, but that this cooperation had an objection... that of preventing him from making use of certain improved appliances which were able to run the first train passing off its rails. The railway workers procured by him had, in fact, put the formal condition to their cooperation, that no, trains carrying war material should be run off the rails. After this stupefying conversation which, Irepeat had not provoked either on 'the part of M. Poole or M. Grenard the slfghtest objection, Lieutenant Riley concluded, in addressing himself to M. de Vertamond, that it was necessary for them „to divide the work" and to act in close contact with each other, but with prudence and as much as possible „through the intermediary of women", as the latter „roused suspicion much less easily". Further, he added