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Why I side with the Social Revolution
Image 64
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Marchand, René, 1888-. Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 64. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-. (1920). Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 64. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/162

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-, Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 64, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I side with the Social Revolution
Alternative Title Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marchand, René, 1888-
Publisher Publishing office of the Communust International
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Saint Petersburg, Russia
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 85 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.17.M3713 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304506~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Note Translation of: Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 64
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25190168_063.jpg
Transcript 62 * project, according to which he proposed to blow up the railway bridge which crosses the river Volkhoff, a little way before the station Zvanka. What is particularly singular is that lieutenant Riley did not in any way conceal from himself the extreme gravity of the consequences that the realisation of his project might have, for he observed guite coldly that the wrecking of this bridge cuts off Petrograd from all communication, not only from the North but also from the East (Vologda—Viatka line) from which Petrograd exclusively received all the trains of wheat, cereals, and, in general, almost all its provision •already so precarious, so insufficient for its population. And Riley himself concluded that the wreching of the bridge could have as its direct consequence the complete starvation of PetrograH, that is to say not of the fortunate minority of rich bourgeois who had and would always have the means of emigrating south, but principally, exclusively, of the working population and 'clerks, including old men, women and children.—Nevertheless, the frightful perspective did not prevent him from "continuing the study of this infernal plan, any more than it for one second troubled the peace of mind of the Consul-General of the United States and France, who, probably, had not heard of this affair for the first time. The French agent to whom Lieutenant Riley addressed himself, more particularly than to the other persons present, was M. de Vertamond. He had been introduced to me recently at the French Consulate by M. Grenard, as an officer of the French navy, occupied with „work of destruction" in the Ukraine (where at that time, the most