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Why I side with the Social Revolution
Image 50
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Marchand, René, 1888-. Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 50. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-. (1920). Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 50. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/148

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-, Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 50, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I side with the Social Revolution
Alternative Title Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marchand, René, 1888-
Publisher Publishing office of the Communust International
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Saint Petersburg, Russia
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 85 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.17.M3713 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304506~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Note Translation of: Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 50
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25190168_049.jpg
Transcript the various phases, without omitting any of them: many of fhem will seem to-day of a simplicity which is devoid of all interest but, as I have stated, they are all so closely linked together in my mind that I am unable to leave any out. Further, their continuity will explain how and why, in spite of essentially bourgeois prejudices, of the circle in which I have lived, I had, nevertheless, one day necessarily to end by understanding bolshevism,—not through socialist education, but spontaneously and in- stinctivelly, firstly from the national 'Russian point of view and, secondly, from the point of view of the revolutionaly proletariat, the Marxian and international point of view. A series of facts were destined gradually to shake my first convictions as to the need of an allied a n t i-bo 1 s h evi k intervention, and my credulity in the absurd legend of the Bolsheviks being German agents. It was, first of all, the insurrection of Yaroslavl which, I have already mentioned, impressed me very vividly and. very painfully. As I have stated already, I knew that it had been set on foot by our ambassador personally, and this painful circumstance was added to the disillusionment I had already experienced in regard to the continual deferment of our intervention (at a time when the Russian people so violently exhausted by German Imperialism had so urgent a need of our most generous and efficacious aid). For the first time, I began to doubt seriously the sincerity of the solemn promises in which up to then I had placed my trust. This intervention, constantly delayed and which, from the