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Why I side with the Social Revolution
Image 48
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Marchand, René, 1888-. Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 48. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-. (1920). Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 48. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/146

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-, Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 48, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I side with the Social Revolution
Alternative Title Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marchand, René, 1888-
Publisher Publishing office of the Communust International
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Saint Petersburg, Russia
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 85 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.17.M3713 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304506~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Note Translation of: Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 48
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25190168_047.jpg
Transcript 46 government, because I believed the revolution and the Russian republic to be killed by Bolshevism, instead of understanding, on the contrary, that under the standard of bolshevism, the revolution and the republic were progressing and asserting themselves, and that-the bolshevik government alone was capable of regrouping on the basis of the Soviets and Federation, all the nationalities which had formerly constituted the Russian State. But my monarchic conception was not at all that of Noulens. What our ambassador had in view,—when he „secretlv" let it be known to „friends of the right" that M Clemenceau himself thought that a monarchic government best suited the requirements of Russia,- was the re-establishment of what had previously existed, in a slightly different form (a constitutional monarchy), but with, perhaps, even more „ firmness", more force in the exercise of its sovereign power. Briefly, a monarchy m ^e,wueStern' EuroPean meaning of the word. What I conceived, on the contrary, was the establishment of a popular monarchy On many occasions already, under the former regime, I had often expressed the idea that the Russian monarchy should never develope in the direction of an impotent and obsolete parliamentarism, which would not be able to rejuvenate and restore it, but that it should rather go back to its origins, the profound national traditions of Russia, from which it had deviated in order to become autocratic, which is a mixture of oriental despotism and west European absolutism. The national form of Russian monarchy had the form of a popular government with the