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Why I side with the Social Revolution
Image 37
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Marchand, René, 1888-. Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 37. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-. (1920). Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 37. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/135

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marchand, René, 1888-, Why I side with the Social Revolution - Image 37, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/191/show/135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Why I side with the Social Revolution
Alternative Title Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marchand, René, 1888-
Publisher Publishing office of the Communust International
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Saint Petersburg, Russia
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 85 pages; 19 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.17.M3713 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304506~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Note Translation of: Pourquoi je me suis rallié à la formule de la révolution sociale.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 37
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_25190168_036.jpg
Transcript 35 arrived at Moscow, where our Military Mission was located, and where to the Bolshevik Government had transferred itself trom Petrograd. Very shortly after M. Grenard's instatement in office, a telegram from M. Pichon was received, requesting that an enquiry be opened as to the opinion of the different political parties regarding an armed Japanese intervention, with a view to driving back the German invasion of Russia. The question of armed intervention of the Allies in Russia, hitherto looked upon from an entirely hypothetical standpoint, was thus raised in a very precise manner. Two opposite points of view quickly asserted themselves on this question. On the one hand intervention with the cooperation, or, at least, the assent of the Bolshevik Government: on the other hand, intervention against this Government and even intervention destined to overthrow it, and to reestablish the eastern front against Germany. At first, for a brief period, our new Consul- General seemed to hesitate between these two points of view, or rather to attempt to reconcile them, whereas our Military Mission, „under the influence of Captain Sadoul" was inclined to agree with the first. Attached as I was by my work to the Consulate, it was only rarely that I had relations with the Military Mission, and at that time I did not know Captain Sadoul, whom I had met casually only once or twice, and with ^whom I had never, really had an occasion of conversing. Captain Sadoul was subjected to much violent criticism in our propaganda circles for his attitude. He was „Trotsky's man", the man whom Trotzky had „the audacity to introduce to our Ambassador", 3*