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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 52
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 52. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1777.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 52. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1777

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 52, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1777.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 52
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_051.jpg
Transcript MOVING PICTURES, TOO The moving pictures were also made use of to spread among the masses the most extreme fabrications about Soviet Russia. Several films were released along these lines. An instance is the picture entitled "The New Moon," with Norma Talmadge as the star. This picture dramatized in the most revolting way the canard about the nationalization of women. It purported to show the women of the Saratov district placed at the disposal of the leaders of the Soviet Government and the members of the Red Army to be outraged at will—all by the decree of the Soviet Government. Mr. Robert M. Buck,, editor of the New Majority, Chicago's labor weekly, wrote to Miss Talmadge protesting against the lending of her artistic talent to spreading fabrications against the Russian people. The extent to which this canard was accepted even before Miss Talmadge spread it into hundreds of thousands more minds is shown by her letter in answer to Mr. Buck: It therefore grieves me very much that the readers of the New Majority should doubt my sincerity. If you will remember the numerous articles that appeared in the New York newspapers on the subject of the decree issued at Saratoff and the meeting of the presidents of the women's clubs from all over the country to discuss this decree, it seems to me that you could hardly criticize my believing these things to be facts. (New Majority, July 12, 1919.) THE LAWS OF FABRICATION Even the briefest account such as this of American slander and abuse of the Russian people is not complete without an attempt to apportion the responsibility. Perhaps the simplest method is to compare the degree of fabrications with the character of their source. Any tabulation which gives, on one side of the column, the fabrications in a descending scale of viciousness and absurdity and on the other the sources, with their economic, social and political connections, will disclose the presence of a well- defined sociological law. Stated in its simplest terms it is this: The more conservative the source, the more absurd is the fabrication. Those newspapers and the prominent men who are well known for their conservative position on public questions have been the worst offenders against truth and decency in regard to Russia. To take the New York papers as an illustration. The Sun, the Times and the Herald have been the most unscrupulous in their disregard of fact through their news columns 50