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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 51
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 51. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1776.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 51. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1776

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 51, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1776.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 51
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_050.jpg
Transcript Miss Wood's statement of her own offense is as follows: I gave definitions of Bolshevism and anarchy and Soviet. Following the approved practice in any such class discussion, I referred the students to certain articles in magazines—Current Opinion for February, the New Republic and the Dial, the first two being in the files of the school library. We never discussed the situation in Russia. I never defended Bolshevism, and a perusal of the articles in the magazines referred to will prove that they did not defend Bolshevism. (N. Y. Times, April 27, 1919.) It was brought out in connection with this case that the complaint against Miss Wood came from parents of her pupils: Frank P. Reeside, secretary of the Equitable Cooperative Building Society, and Thomas Bradley, vice-president of the Washington Loan and Trust Company. The Board of Education which suspended Miss Wood included men of equal wealth and business interest, such as its president, George E. Hamilton, who is also president of the Capital Traction Company ; John B. Larner, president of the Washington Loan and Trust Company; John Jay Edson, chairman of the Board of Directors of the same company, and others. (See N. Y. Times, April 27, 1919.) In the examinations on the Great War given to pupils in the New York City high schools on June 12, 1919, the following questions were put: (a) Who are the Russian Bolsheviki and what are their chief aims? (b) Do you believe the following principles to be in accord with or in opposition to their aims: (1) Rule by the majority. (2) Progress under the law. (3) The right of each person to the product of his efforts. (4) Encouragement of individual initiative. (c) Do you believe Bolshevism to be a danger threatening the people of New York ? If so, Why ? (d) Tell definitely the sources of your information about Bolshevism. Each pupil was also required to give the names of his teachers in history and English. Two statements of Dr. John L. Tildsley, Superintendent of High Schools, disclose the real meaning of these questions in the light of current misrepresentation about Russia. "We have no obligation to graduate a student whose attitude is hostile to our American institutions." 'The number of teachers that adhere to un-American doctrines is quite negligible and even if they desired to preach their doctrines to the pupils they would not dare." 49