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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 50
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 50. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1775.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 50. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1775

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 50, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1775.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 50
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_049.jpg
Transcript their hands on.' Selfishness and greed are, of course at the roots of it. . . . The party, if such it can be called, is made up of many discordant elements—Socialists, Anarchists, Nihilists, Communists, Socialist visionaries, thieves, pickpockets, robbers, terrorists, grafters and a great mass of ignorant, unthinking people, all united for the present in a blind desire to destroy all whom they fancy to be in a position superior to their own. THE PROCESSES OF EDUCATION How far the schools have been used to further anti-Russian propaganda will never be known. There is little doubt, however, that the public schools have been used without restraint to spread fabrications about Soviet Russia. This would seem to be the only reason for the expulsion of several teachers from the public schools for having suggested to their pupils that the current conceptions of Russian affairs might prove to be distorted and that, at least, it would be well for them to hear both sides of the argument. The expulsion of Benjamin Glassberg from the Commercial High School, New York City, and the suspension of Miss Alice Wood from the Western High School, Washington, D. C, are cases in point. The charge against Mr. Glassberg and the method of his dismissal were summarized by the Tribune in the news account of his "conviction" by the committee of the Board of Education sitting on his case as follows: Benjamin Glassberg, history teacher, suspended . . . last January on a charge of declaring the State Department had suppressed the truth about affairs in Russia, has been found guilty by the Board of Education, it was learned yesterday. Glassberg . . . was alleged to have told his pupils, in answer to questions, that the Bolsheviki are not as bad as they are painted, and that apparently Lenin and Trotzky are much more in favor with the Russian people than was Kerensky, since the former two have been permitted to remain in power so long. . . . The testimony against Glassberg was furnished by eight pupils, but was contradicted by several other boys in the same class. (N. Y. Tribune May 28, 1919.) The complaint against Miss Wood, as stated by the District of Columbia Board of Education, was as follows: Indiscreet discussion before young people of present international conditions, social and political; her defense of Bolshevism; her offer to instruct boys on the subject out of class; her advice to them to read certain named magazines, which would give the other and correct side of the aims and precepts of that form of government; her advanced ideas on individual direction and that such instruction was impressed upon immature youth with that added weight which a teacher's instruction carries. (Letter from Board of Education quoted in Washington Post, April 10,' j 919.) 48