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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 49
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 49. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1774.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1774

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 49, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1774.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_048.jpg
Transcript In all the literature about Russia, both pro and anti-Soviet, this is the first and only indication that the Government of the United States, or one like it, furnished one of the ideals of the March revolution. "Princess Cantacuzene charged/' says the Times reporter, "that the present regime was brought about through German money." " There were German gold and documents in Lenin's house, some of which I personally saw/ she said." Captain Martin's contributions to the truth about Russia may be judged by the following report of a statement made by him at the Hotel Buckingham, the committee's headquarters. Red revolutionists who have made their way into this country have been devoting their efforts largely to arousing racial hatred among the most ignorant of the blacks and they have staked their hopes largely on this class. (N. Y. Sun.) GETTING AT THE CHILDREN Certain organizations have carried their anti-Soviet propaganda of falsehood among the children of America. There are many examples. For instance, the Curtis Publishing Company, publishers of the Saturday Evening Post, the Ladies' Home Journal and other periodicals, sent to its army of boy subscription-solicitors the following statement in its monthly business-getter, Our Boys, of December, 1919: What is a Bolshevik? A Bolshevik is a boy who believes there should be no teachers in school. . . . He believes that the best way to get his friend's jack-knife is to take it, and that maybe the best plan is to have no school at all—to burn down the building so that he can watch a bonfire. He believes that football should be played without rules and that he ought to be allowed to play it with a tennis ball if he wants to. This is exactly the kind of system that a lot of long-haired foreign agitators are trying to use in running their governments and they would like to see our country mixed up in the same sort of thing. Current Events, a publication which styles itself "a condensed newspaper, weekly, for use in public and private schools," which goes by the hundreds of thousands into the hands of school children and is indorsed officially by many school principals, carried the following in its issue of November 15, 1918: What is the meaning of the terms 'Bolshevik' and 'Soviets'? Bolshevik . . . refers to the party of extremists now in power in Russia and may be freely translated as 'Those who want everything they can lay 47