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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 48
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 48. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1773.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 48. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1773

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 48, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1773.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 48
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_047.jpg
Transcript for a number of decrees, many of them admirable in theory, for the free education of the whole people. In reality these reforms exist only on paper, all education having broken down under the oppression of a regime, which in spite of all Bolshevist inducements has alienated the sympathies of that hitherto most revolutionary body, the Union of Russian Teachers, (p. 60.) Shatov* has in his face every indication of criminal degeneracy. A hopeless drunkard, a sexual pervert, this man is eminently fitted for the task of torture and oppression in which he revels now. His case is the best illustration of the undisputed fact that the whole Bolshevist regime is led mostly by criminals or criminal degenerates, (p. 67.) The Executive Committee of the Association responsible for this pamphlet includes the President of Columbia University, Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler; Thomas W. Lamont of J. P. Morgan & Company; James Speyer, and other Americans of great prominence. RELIEF BY MISREPRESENTATION An organization called the American Central Committee for Russian Relief has been another anti-Soviet Russia propaganda agency of considerable influence among wealthy Americans. With the generous cooperation of the press this body has contributed to American opinion a considerable supply of Russian fabrications. The object of the committee is stated to be relief of Russian refugees from Soviet territory, but it figures in the newspapers largely through the public utterances of its president, the Princess Cantacuzene, and of one of its lecturers, Hugh S. Martin, formerly chief of the United States Military Intelligence in North Russia. The quality of this propaganda and how it is disseminated may be gained by the following examples. Princess Cantacuzene spoke at a small meeting held at the Church of St. John the Evangelist on Waverley Place on January 31, 1920. The next morning the Times gave a whole column to an almost verbatim account of her address. The importance of the meeting as news, however, was obviously negligible. Princess Cantacuzene said in part, according to this report: When the first revolution occurred in Russia, rich and poor alike ioined in thanking God for the new day. . . . There was no class feeling and everyone was filled with a desire to develop a republic along the lines of the United States. * William Shatov, Chief of the Petrograd Police. 46