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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 44
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 44. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1769.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 44. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1769

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 44, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1769.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 44
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_043.jpg
Transcript MISINFORMATION FROM AN INFORMATION BUREAU Certain organizations have added their share to American misunderstanding of Soviet Russia. Chief among these has been "The Russian Information Bureau," of which Mr. A. J. Sack is director, with offices in the Woolworth Building, New York. It has been one of the most active organs of anti- Russian propaganda in the United States. With apparently unlimited sums of money and with the generous cooperation of the press at its command, it has filled the newspapers with full-page advertisements, and column-long "statements" from Mr. Sack. It issues a magazine, Struggling Russia, and has published books on the subject of Russia. Mr. Sack has been able to get a half-column "story" into the New York dailies any day when sympathizers with the Soviet Government could not get half a line. All this propaganda has been directed to the overthrow of the Russian Government by armed intervention of the United States on the side of Kolchak, Denikin and other counter- revolutionists seeking to set up the old order of things. It has, moreover, been openly charged by responsible people that the Russian Information Bureau has been subsidized and supported by the so-called "Russian Embassy" at Washington. The "embassy" and the "ambassador," Mr. Bakhmeteff, are still recognized by the Government of the United States as the representatives of the Russian Government, although one government they were authorized to represent—Kerensky's— went out of existence in November, 1917, and the other government they sought to represent — Kolchak's — collapsed before it ever gained control. (1) The propaganda of the Russian Information Bureau, like other anti-Soviet propaganda, has been a tissue of falsehood. A fair sample is the following statement issued by Mr. Sack at the time when the press was falsely reporting "a general uprising against the Bolsheviki in Russia." This is the end of Bolshevism, a rule of a criminal minority over an overwhelming majority. . . . The Bolsheviki find themselvese in an iron ring from which there is no escape. Their situation is the more difficult because even in the territory they still control they find themselves face to face with a population which hates them and stands ready to throw off their yoke at the first opportune moment. The latest advices point to the end of Bolshevism, the nightmare of Russia and of humanity. (N.%Y. Tribune, October 10, 1919.) • William Hard, writing in the New Republic of July 23 and 30, 1919, describes in some detail the "career of misinforming 42