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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 42
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 42. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1767.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 42. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1767

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 42, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1767.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 42
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_041.jpg
Transcript Mr. Bullard's is the least objectionable. The book as a whole paints the Soviet regime a dirty grey rather than a bloody red or filthy black. The general effect, however, is that the Soviet regime does not represent the Russian masses; that it was largely financed from Germany; that it cannot last, and that the Allies should establish a sort of benevolent protectorate over Russia recognizing a de facto government until some representative and stable regime should be set up. Subsequent events, of course, have shown how inaccurate any such estimate was. Mr. Bullard, in fact, has placed himself in a position where history can be written in his own words to refute his whole position. Speaking of Kolchak's campaign in Siberia he says (on! p. 279): Something in the nature of a democratic election is in progress. Public opinion in the disputed territory on the relative merits of the two sides in the civil war controls the fluctuations at the front. It is very I largely a war of propaganda. . . . The great advance of the Siberian Army indicates that a great part of the present population of this district sees more chance of realizing their aspirations under Kolchak than under Lenin. General Denikin's forces in Southeast Russia are operating in even more densely populated territory. So far as the anti-Bolshevist forces make themselves unpopular in the territory they occupy, their advance will be slowed up. If they advance rapidly it shows that the people are tired of Bolshevism. Again, on p. 245, Mr. Bullard says: A government which was obviously winning the consent of the governed, endeavoring to build up local self-government and the idea of majority rule would be sure of enthusiastic support in America. It would be very expensive for a Russian government suspected of reactionary intentions to float a loan in Wall Street. It would be easy to secure wide popular subscription on most favorable terms to build little red school- houses all over Russia. Any comment other than the development of events in Russia on the one hand and Allied diplomacy—especially American—on the other is unnecessary. Mr. Spargo has been far more violent in his misrepresentations about Russia. He paints the Soviet regime in the colors of conventional fabrication, luridly red and black: a bloody and reactionary autocracy challenging the opposition of a democratic world. And he does so by the skilfull manipulation of facts, quotations and original sources. William Hard has exposed the process in a striking article in the New Republic of July 9, 1919. He has caught Mr. Spargo in the most glaring misstatements and the pettiest kind of text twisting and quotation distortion. 40