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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 41
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 41. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1766.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 41. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1766

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 41, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1766.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 41
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_040.jpg
Transcript And these are the sort of beasts who are allowed to build the foundations of a monstrous conspiracy to plunge this country into a hell of anarchy, unmolested, using the machinery of your government itself for the spreading of the plot to destroy it. What is the matter at Washington ? "LITERARY LAPSES" Other sources of misrepresentation and fabrication have been books published by authors claiming to have some right to speak with authority about Russia. The most vicious of these have been accepted by the largest publishers and have received the widest publicity. They have been, as a result, the most widely read and have, for that reason, caused the most confusion. The books which have caused the widest misunderstanding have been John Spargo's two books, entitled "Bolshevism" and "The Psychology of Bolshevism," published by Harper's; Charles Edward Russell's "Bolshevism and the United States," published by Bobbs, Merrill, and Arthur Bullard's "The Russian Pendulum," published by Macmillan. These three authors have all of them been at one time known as Socialists and, in the case of Spargo and Russell at least, their former affiliations have been capitalized to great effect in the sale and influence of their books. All three authors have bitterly attacked Soviet Russia. All three have employed the most dangerous and subtle of weapons: a show of scholarship, apparent wealth of authenticated detail and a disarming appearance of admitting the falsehood of much that has been said about Russia. Spargo, Russell and Bullard, like most converts from a former faith, are extreme antagonists of Soviet Russia. Before they began to write on the subject their antagonism attracted much comment. Their books were, of course, written as anti-Soviet propaganda; written with the intention of discrediting the Russian Government and aiding the forces seeking its overthrow. To those who knew the personal history of these authors, and had reason to be critical, this fact caused deep suspicion of the validity of these books. The satisfaction of the great majority of their readers, however, who found in them "just what they had been looking for," more than counterbalanced that suspicion, and the books have been conspicuously "successful." It is impossible in the space of a pamphlet to point out in detail the quality and quantity of the misrepresentation of which these works are guilty. 39