Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 39
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 39. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1764.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 39. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1764

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 39, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1764.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 39
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_038.jpg
Transcript Decree, without possessing the power to carry it out. What authority such a group imagined it had in the matter from the Kronstadt Soviet, I was unable to determine. In the course of six months in Russia I had never found record or other allusion to any such document, although it was generally known that the Kronstadt Soviet, a local body, rearranged human affairs periodically and not always seriously and never with the authority of the Central Executive Committee of the Soviets. THE EDITORIAL WAR AGAINST RUSSIA In their editorials the American press has exceeded every other source in the quantity and quality of abusive fabrications about Russia. The number of extreme examples are literally without number. To show, however, the lengths to which Americans have gone in their efforts to undermine the Soviet Government of Russia the following may be quoted as typical examples: Washington Post, May 28, 1919: Gradually the sane element in Russia is gaining the upper hand over the assassins and madmen calling themselves Bolsheviki. From Siberia a great broom is sweeping the human scum westward against the wall, while from both north and south other Russian forces are closing in on the Bolsheviki. Petrograd is about to fall to still another force and immediately upon the fall of the city Herbert Hoover will start in motion the machinery of feeding the starving people. Harvey's Weekly: We are through with Hapgood and his opinions of the relative merits of the two worst scoundrels and greatest murderers the world has ever produced. (Quoted from an editorial by Col. E. M. Harvey, N. Y. Tribune, January 9, 1920, referring to Norman Hapgood, ex-U. S. Minister to Denmark, and his views about Lenin and Trotzky.) New York Tribune, December 31, 1919 (under the title "Recognizing a Cancer") : Lenin is well known to the world. He was first generally heard of when the German Government forwarded him on a special train to Russia. Arrived in Petrograd he spent German money to induce Russia to betray loyal allies and to scuttle from the defense of civilization. He preached mutiny, an opening of the German lines. Next, setting himself up as a new czar, he dispersed with machine guns an assembly the Russian people had freely elected to write a constitution. Then he signed a treaty with Germany which betrayed Poles, Letts, Lithuanians, Finns and Ukrainians to Germany. When Central Russia objected to starvation he launched an atrocity campaign that shamed even the Germans and made the tyranny of Ivan the Terrible seem benevolent. It is doubtful whether it would be humanly possible to pack more fabrications and more distortions of the facts of 37