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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 37
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 37. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1762.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 37. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1762

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 37, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1762.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 37
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_036.jpg
Transcript In spite of the novelty of Samara's cosmopolitan guests, the talk of the city on our arrival was focused on a proclamation pasted broadcast on bulletin boards and stone walls. Copies of this document were at a premium, and here and there corners were torn away as souvenirs. From a complete text, I had the following translation made into English: DECREE 'This decree is proclaimed by the Free Association of Anarchists of the city of Saratoff, in compliance with the decision of the Soviet of Peasants', Soldiers' and Workmen's Deputies of Kronstadt regarding the abolition of the private possession of women.' (Saratoff, with a population of 250,000 lies 200 miles southwest of Samara on the Volga River.) Mr. Sayler then gives a verbatim translation of the "decree" in all the revolting details which the press has taken such special care to publish broadside throughout the United States. Mr. Sayler then describes his personal experiences with the group of anarchists under whose name the "decree" was published: An astonishing document, inexplicable and incredible anywhere except in Russia today. And even in Russia the explanation was difficult and elusive. In quest of an explanation, however, I dropped into the Anarchists' clubhouse in Samara one morning with Smith and Humphries of the *Y.' Not so very remotely, the luxurious and commodious building had been the home of one of Samara's millionaires, but the Anarchists had decided it would make an admirable clearing house for their social and political activities, and by virtue of their imposing numbers and power they had been permitted by the Bolsheviki to dispossess the owner and move in themselves. And so here they were, flying their black flag at the front door, just a few feet away from the Roman Catholic church of the city! Russia abounds in paradoxes today, but I doubt whether a stranger contrast could be found in all that stricken land. Inside we found reading rooms and study rooms and dispensers of voluminous Anarchist 'literature' and propaganda. In one room a group of the leaders, strange-eyed, alert men and women of the fanatic type, gathered to ask us the latest news of Tom Mooney and of America's arch-Anarchists, Emma Goldman, Ben Reitman and Alexander Berk- man. Humphries volunteered the desired information, but I was too overwhelmed by this uncanny reversal of accepted social phenomena to do more than stand agape as I would at an engrossing drama. I had no fear. Instead of brutality, the faces of our hosts reflected a strange spiritual quality akin to madness. But I felt a considerable relief when we reached the street again. Before we left, a copy of a Proclamation in answer to the one purporting to come from the Saratoff Anarchists was thrust into our hands in reply to our questions concerning the document quoted above. This reply, translated into English, reads: 35