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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 36
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 36. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1761.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 36. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1761

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 36, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1761.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 36
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_035.jpg
Transcript Levine, special correspondent of the Chicago Daily News and New York Globe, who was in Russia at the time and who has had the courage to report his observations as he made them. The Soviet government came into power peacefully. It continued to rule peacefully for about five months, during which time no serious counter-revolutionary efforts were made by any one. In the spring of 1918 the Socialist Revolutionists assassinated Uritzky and Volodarsky. This party was the old party of the Terrorists of the Czar's time, of which Spiridonova was one of the leaders. When they used Terroristic methods to seek to overthrow the Soviet government the latter responded by seizing, imprisoning and executing leaders of that party. During the whole period of government terror, almost two years in length, not more than 4,000 persons were executed by the Soviet Government. For example, I examined the records in Moscow for the first three weeks in May, 1919. During that time eighty-five persons were put to death, and nine-tenths of these were killed for civil crimes, such highway robbery, burglary and the like. (N. Y. Globe, March 3, 1920.) THE NATIONALIZATION OF WOMEN—IN AMERICA For weeks the papers were full of the stories of the nationalization of women; the text of decrees were printed purporting to prove that women were public property in Soviet Russia. The Associated Press, in a dispatch from London dated April 15, 1919, went so far as to transmit a long dispatch commenting on the administration of this decree. "The law providing for the nationalization of women in Northeast Russia," it states, "has been suspended in one province as the result of popular outcry" . . . and so on for three-quarters of a column. This whole story of the nationalization of women was so obviously absurd that some of its chief disseminators finally retracted it. The New Europe, the English periodical in which the so-called decrees were originally published, admitted its mistake and made public apology in its issue of March 13, 1919. Even the United States Department of State took pains to deny the tale. In the official press release of February 28, 1919, the Department stated: "The rumor as to the nationalization of women is not true." It is safe to say, however, that out of one hundred people who read the original stories not more than one or two ever saw the denials. The most authoritative and direct evidence about the origin of this canard has come from the pen of one of the most impartial Americans who ever visited Soviet Russia- Oliver M. Sayler. In his book "Russia: White or Red " published in 1919 by Little, Brown & Co. of Boston, Mr. 'Sayler says (p. 183): 34