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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 34
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 34. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1759.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 34. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1759

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 34, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1759.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_033.jpg
Transcript National City Bank, who predicted internal tranquillity for Russia three months before the revolution. It also, includes such solid names as Charles H. Sabin, President of the Guaranty Trust Company, and A. Barton Hepburn. The stability of such names would seem to insure accuracy of statement. But such is not the case. On November 11, the day after the "massacre" was scheduled to occur, an obscure item in the New York World, announcing in its headline that "threat of massacre seems to have been a fake," appeared. No other New York paper carried even that denial. The only incident of the day in Russia, according to the World dispatch, was the granting of amnesty by the Soviet Government to political prisoners! THE RED TERROR OF THE PRESS The news columns of the American press have been given over to the most unrestrained fabrications about the "Red Terror." With a perspective of even a few months and more reliable accounts, it is possible now to see the magnitude of absurdity to which these stories went. A fair sample of hundreds of such dispatches is one sent out by the Associated Press under a Stockholm date line on October 14, 1918, and published in the Times on the 17th. Despite protests made by neutral Ministers, the wholesale slaughter of persons charged with counter-revolution continues unabated. . . . Large numbers were being executed daily on the slightest pretext and under the most revolting conditions. The mania for murder is so strong among the Bolshevist officials, the refugees say, that they even shoot their own partisans. The firing squads take delight in forcing condemned men to jump down automobiles and in shooting them before the eyes of the other victims. . . . Another sample appeared in the Times of November 1 under the headline, "Mme. Breshkovskaya Executed by Reds." Amsterdam, Oct. 31.—According to a Petrograd telegram Mme. Breshkovskaya, Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution, was shot on October 27 on the charge of opposing the Bolshevist regime. This was only a few months before Mme. Breshkovsky came to the United States for her extended lecture tour. EDITORIAL MURDER AND RIOT The impression of these dispatches was bolstered up and kept alive by a constant flow of abusive, and all but completely 32