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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 33
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 33. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1758.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 33. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1758

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 33, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1758.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_032.jpg
Transcript Harold Williams, it may be remarked in passing, was the Times' star Russian correspondent whose dispatches have been always given the greatest prominence in its columns. He has been considered, in conventional circles, as a Russian authority. These dispatches caused the greatest excitement in the United States. They were commented upon by papers from coast to coast as conclusive proof that the Soviet Government had let loose wholesale murder and assassination. A fair sample of editorial opinion is the Times editorial of November 1, 1918: The opening up of the Dardanelles to their ships of war presents the opportunity and brings into view the duty of the Allies to put a stop to the bloody massacres planned and perpetrated by the Bolsheviki in Russia. They have proclaimed a St. Bartholemew for the night of November 10 when it is their purpose to surpass all their previous exploits in murder. They have decreed for that night the assassination of all Russians of the middle class, all the intellectuals who can be reached by their bands of murderers. Mr. Harold Williams, in London, sounds a warning that should be heeded. He says there are the gravest reasons for fearing a reign of terror and bloodshed that will destroy what is left of the classes who alone keep alive the hope that Russia may be saved and reconstituted. The Bolshiviki are ravening beasts of prey, a large part of them actual criminals, all of them mad with the raging passions of the class struggle, preached into their dull minds by Lenin, Trotzky and their kind. There will be bloody work in Petrograd and Moscow if it is not stopped. . . . Mr. Bakhmeteff, the so-called "Russian Ambassador" at Washington—appointed by the long-defunct Kerensky Government and at the time representing only the ambitions of the enemies of Soviet Russia—went so far as to propose, on November 7, to the Department of State at Washington that "the Bolsheviki and German agents be held personally responsible for the massacre before an international court." On November 6 the Times printed the following news item: The American-Russian Chamber of Commerce in New York appealed yesterday to civic and religious organizations throughout the country to protest against the massacre in Russia of all the bourgeoisie which, according to cable dispatches last week, the Bolsheviki intend to carry out on November 10. The Chamber has received information indicating that the Bolsheviki plan a massacre on a greater scale than previous advices have indicated. The American-Russian Chamber of Commerce is an association of prominent business men of large interests which has kept up a steady stream of anti-Soviet propaganda. Its Board of Directors includes the name of Mr. McRoberts of the 31