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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 32
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 32. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1757.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 32. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1757

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 32, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1757.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 32
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_031.jpg
Transcript r There were several kinds of disinfectants, and fully a score of infirmaries and hospitals were open. As for robber bands, I do not believe there ever has been a time in its history when Petrograd was more free from the peril of criminal marauders. I walked about the streets frequently late at nights unarmed and with the feeling of perfect security which the very harshness of the Soviet methods against the lav/less elements cannot help but give one. Many legitimate criticisms could be formulated against the municipal administration of Petrograd at the time in question, but none of the points touched upon in this Stockholm work of fiction could properly be included in such criticism. To my mind, the above quoted yarn is a charmingly complete specimen of the fanciful descriptions of life in Russia under the Bolsheviki. A writer in a recent issue of the Nation has summed up the Petrograd fabrications in a sentence: Petrograd has "thus far fallen six times, been burned to the ground twice, been in absolute panic twice, has starved to death constantly, and has revolted against the Bolsheviks on no less than six different occasions—all in the columns of the Times. THE "MASSACRE" OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW II A few of the notable instances of newspaper falsification may be mentioned. All of them have left their impression deep in the American mind in spite of subsequently forced denials. The famous St. Bartholemew's massacre that never happened but caused nevertheless an immense sensation in the United States is an illustration. The New York Times on October 31, 1918, featured on the front page the following headlines: "GREAT MASSACRE PLANNED BY REDS—NIGHT OF NOVEMBER 10 FIXED FOR A ST. BARTHOLEMEW OF RUSSIAN BOURGEOISIE — WILD PANIC IN PETROGRAD." Under this head were the following news dispatches, both special cables to the Times: Copenhagen, Oct. 30.—A special to the Koebenhaven from Petrograd reports that the Bolsheviki now openly declare that the night of November 10 will be a general St. Bartholomew, with the murder of the entire bourgeoisie and intellectual class. Indescribable panic is said to reign in Petrograd. London, Oct. 30.—With reference to the Copenhagen report that the Bolsheviki intend to make November 10 a general St. Bartholemew for the bourgeoisie, Harold Williams writes: It is futile to cherish the illusion that the Bolsheviks do not mean what they say. During September their official organ announced daily 500 names of persons shot in cold blood without trial and without reason.' 30