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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 21
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 21. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1746.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1746

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 21, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1746.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_020.jpg
Transcript Radical agitation in this country, with its resultant social unrest, is not due to economic conditions, but to an organized, artificially stimulated movement under the inspiration of the Russian Soviet Government. This opinion will be submitted to the New York Legislature in an exhaustive report by the Joint Legislative Committee which has been investigating radical activities here since its organization last May, it was learned today. (New York Evening Post, December 9, 1919.) As it happened, a statement from United States Attorney General Palmer on the same subject appeared in the Times of the same day. Mr. Palmer said: It is clearly recognized that the present unrest and tendency towards radicalism arise from social and economic conditions that are of greater consequence than the individual agitator. Perhaps the most absurd fabrication in the Lusk Committee's record was the statement made to the press by Deputy Attorney General Samuel A. Berger in the middle of November, 1919: Ludwig Martens is here as an enemy of the United States, as the agent of conspirators in Russia who are planning to bring about a bloody revolution in this country and destroy its government by force. ("The Truth About the Lusk Committee," p. 30.) The New York Tribune, on November 18, 1919, published a headline that ran across the entire front page in bold type. It said: "MARTENS ADMITS LENIN SENT HIM TO OVERTHROW U. S." The news account below was a story of Mr. Martens' testimony before the Lusk Committee the day before. Not a word in the entire account supported the headline assertion. The nearest approach was the following: "Isn't it a fact that in stating its wishes to overthrow the capitalist system, the Soviet Government wishes to overthrow all capitalist governments?" asked Mr. Stevenson. "That is their wish. They wish to change from the capitalist to the Socialist system," answered Mr. Martens. "How do they expect this change to come about?" "The change mav come -by pur^Y VVn^n means, or it may come through a bitter struggle. They do not care how it is done." This is a sample of the cordial cooperation which the press gave to the Lusk Committee in its campaign to discredit Mr. Martens and, through him, the government he represents. The headline distorted a perfectly simple, truthful statement 19