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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 19
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 19. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1744.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 19. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1744

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 19, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1744.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_018.jpg
Transcript All this was less than twelve months before the same New York Times, under the heading "Law and Order in Soviet Russia/' printed the following statements from the first ofits c&n^apoiidents to actually enter Soviet Russia since~~ffie~frfst year of the revolution, Mr. Arthur Copping. The working millions, in their abiding* fear and hatred of the despotism that is ended, cheerfully put up not only with a grievous shortage of food, fuel and other necessaries that is associated with the democratic era that has dawned for them, but also with the asounding idealistic and hitherto untested economic principles upon which it is sought to build a new social fabric. I told Krassin . . . that the British Government and people were now beginning to believe that Soviet Russia today, instead of being a tyrannical chaos, was an orderly and upward- striving democracy. In contradiction to most of the testimony that has trickled through the frontiers . . . the members of Russia's government, so far from hatching schemes of robbery, spoliation and aggression, are toiling night and day in a self-sacrificing spirit which is almost fanatical, to build up a purely Utopian state based on theories and ideals adopted secretly under the despotism of Tsardom and nurtured through long years of exile. The only Russians who had acquired self-reliance and business efficiency . . . capable of firmly handling the national helm, were these extremists, who composed the following of Lenin. (1) The Lusk-Union League Conspiracy The New York "Lusk Committee/' officially known as the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities, was appointed in March, 1919, at the suggestion and stimulation of the Union League Club of New York, a body of the most prominent, wealthy and influential Republicans in the United States. This committee, under the guidance of a member of the club, Archibald E. Stevenson, pursued the same tactics as the Overman Committee in its efforts to discredit the Russian Soviet Government. The activities of the Lusk Committee, however, were directed primarily against the representative of the Russian Government in the United States, Mr. L. Martens and his staff. The committee found a place on the front pages of the newspapers by staging a spectacular raid on the office of the Russian Soviet Bureau—Mr. Martens' office. Acting under a warrant of questionable validity, and aided by a score of state constabulary and private detectives, Mr. Stevenson forcibly seized all the documents, papers, books and correspondence of the Soviet Bureau on June 12, 1919, and carried them to the offices of the Lusk Committee at the Prince George Hotel. (1) See article entitled "Getting New Republic, March 10, 1920, p. 42. 17 Debamboozled About Russia,"