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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 17
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 17. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1742.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 17. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1742

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 17, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1742.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_016.jpg
Transcript In the meantime some of them [the people of Europe], particularly Russia, are in danger of doing most dangerous things and substituting one kind of autocracy for another, rejecting the Czar, who was cruel at times, and setting up their present masters, who are cruel all the time. . . . (Speech at Bismarck, N. D., reported in New York Times, September 11, 1919.) The men who now are measurably in control of Russia represent nobody but themselves. . . . They have no mandate from anybody. There are only 34 of them, I am told, and there were more than thirty- four men who used to control the destinies of Europe from Wilhelm- strasse. There is a closer monopoly of power in Petrograd and Moscow than there ever was in Berlin; and the thing that is intolerable is not that the Russian people are having their way, but that another group of men more cruel than the Czar himself is controlling the destinies of that great people. (Speech at Des Moines, Iowa, reported in New York Times, September 7, 1919.) Commenting upon these charges of President Wilson's, the New Republic of September 17 remarked: And so he asserts that the Soviet regime Is more cruel than was that of the Czar. Does any one imagine that Woodrow Wilson ever made the least effort to ascertain the facts of either term of his comparison? Does he know now general was the use of "Stolypin's neckties" in the suppression of the liberal revolution of 1906? Has he any acquaintance with the statistics of Siberian exile, or any knowledge of the conditions under which transportation to Siberia was carried on? Has he examined the relation between Czaristic officialdom and such affairs as the massacre of Kishinev? No, he was too busy to inform himself. But, of course, he knows all about the spirit and the practice of the Soviet regime. No; he has been too busy to inform himself. PROPAGANDA BY "INVESTIGATION" The Overman Committee There have been two carefully organized campaigns to discredit Soviet Russia on the part of government agencies. Both have had a considerable effect on the public mind because of the unusual amount of space devoted by the newspapers to their proceedings, and both have spread upon their official records the most unsupportable of fabrications and falsifications. The "Overman Committee" of the United States Senate and the "Lusk Committee,, of the New York State Legislature have probably done more to muddy the waters of intelligence about Russia than any two other single agencies. From February 11 until March 10, 1919, the American papers were screaming in scare heads, and in columns upon columns of news stories, the most scandalous misrepresentation about Soviet Russia, brought to the light by the careful 15