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Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Image 16
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Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 16. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970. (1920). Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1741

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Clark, Evans, 1888-1970, Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia - Image 16, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/1826/show/1741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Facts and fabrication about soviet Russia
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Clark, Evans, 1888-1970
Publisher Rand School of Social Science
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Politics and government
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 93 pages; 20 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.C55 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304542~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_768764_015.jpg
Transcript with the evident intention of influencing their editorial opinion, has expressed this version of the "truth" about Russia over his own signature: ... It is the contention of the Department of Justice. . . . (1) That the present aim of the Russian Government and its officers is to foment and incite discontent, aiming toward a revolution in this country. (2) That the entire movement is a dishonest and criminal one; in other words, an organized campaign to acquire the wealth and power of all countries for the few agitators and their criminal associates. (3) The Red movement does not mean an attitude of protest against alleged defects in our present political and economic organization of society. It does not represent the radicalism of progress. It is not a movement of liberty-loving persons. Lenin himself made the statement at the Third Soviet Conference, "Among the one hundred so-called Bolsheviks there is one real Bolshevik, thirty-nine criminals and sixty fools." It advocates the destruction of all ownership in property, the destruction of all religion and belief in God. It is a movement organized against Democracy, and in favor of the power of the few built by force. Bolshevism, syndicalism, the Soviet Government, sabotage, etc. . . . are only names for old theories of violence and criminality. Having lived at the expense of the Russian people for two years, these speculators in human lives and other people's earnings are trying to move to new fields to the East and to the West, hoping to take advantage of the economic distress and confusion of mind in which humanity finds itself after the terrific strain of five years of war. Its sympathizers in this country are composed chiefly of criminals, mistaken idealists, social bigots and many unfortunate men and women suffering with various forms of hyperesthesia. . . . —(Letter reprinted in the Nation, Feb. 14, 1920, p. 190. Presidential Fabrication Vice-President Thomas R. Marshall was reported in the New York Times of April 21, 1919, to the effect that he "would send a sufficiently large force to Russia to thoroughly exterminate the Bolsheviki." A dispatch from El Paso ran as follows : "This is no time for temporizing with the Bolsheviki," the vice-president said. "Naturally, I am a Democrat and believe in the voice of the people, but I think that voice should come through the ballot box and not through lawless persecution and bloodshed.,,— (New York Times, April 21, 1919.) President Wilson himself took a hand in misrepresenting the Russian situation on his speaking tour through the country in September, 1919. In many addresses he went out of the way to make statements like the following: There are apostles of Lenin in our own midst. I cannot imagine what it means to be an apostle of Lenin. It means to be an apostle of the night, of chaos, of disorder.— (Speech at Helena, Mont., reported in New York Times, September 12, 1919.) 14